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GE - GMO News 09/23



GMO News 09/23 
[apologies as we have no time for contents list today this is 
just to ensure that you have everything for your archives]

> 09/23 1012 DJ Asahi Breweries To Stop Using GM Corn By Apr 
> 200... 
> 
> DJ Asahi Breweries To Stop Using GM Corn By Apr 2000 
> -Nikkei TOKYO (Nikkei)--Asahi Breweries Ltd. (J.ASB or 
> 2502) aims to switch entirely to non-genetically modified 
> corn for its beer by April 2000 amid public concern about 
> the potential health hazards, The Nihon Keizai Shimbun 
> reported in its Friday morning edition. Kirin Brewery Co. 
> 
> (KNBWY or 2503) and Sapporo Beer Breweries Ltd. (J.SAP or 
> 2501) earlier said they will drop use of GM corn by 2001. 
> 
> Asahi uses some 150,000 tons of corn starch and grits 
> annually, most of which are imported from the U.S. The 
> company plans to work with major trading houses to 
> gradually increase purchases of non-GM varieties from 
> October. Beer prices will remain unchanged despite an 
> estimated 20% rise in purchase costs, company sources said. 
> An increasing number of Japanese food producers are 
> switching to non-GM ingredients. The Ministry of 
> Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries decided in August to 
> require labeling of GM foods from 2001. "Although we are 
> confident of the safety of our existing ingredients, we are 
> responding to consumer anxiety about the potential health 
> effects of GM foods," an Asahi official said. (END) DOW 
> JONES NEWS 09-23-99 10:12 AM [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> WSJ(9/23): DuPont's Chief Sings The Praises Of 
> Biotechnology By Susan Warren Dow Jones Newswires BOSTON -- 
> DuPont Co. Chief Executive Charles Holliday took the 
> offensive in the controversy over genetically modified 
> plants and foods, declaring, "we can do wondrous things" 
> for mankind with biotechnology. DuPont, based in 
> Wilmington, Del., plans to respond to growing public fears 
> of genetically altered foods by forming an advisory panel 
> of opinion leaders to serve as a biotechnology watchdog. 
> 
> Mr. Holliday said the panel will be charged with 
> monitoring the company's efforts in biotechnology and will 
> issue regular public reports "to give consumers confidence 
> that this technology is being handled properly." He said 
> the panel will be in place by Jan. 1. In the past year, 
> concern has developed over companies' efforts to engineer 
> improved crops and foods by tinkering with plants' genetic 
> makeup. Environmentalists and some consumer groups have 
> questioned the potential health effects, as well as the 
> environmental impact, of the altered foods. Mr. Holliday 
> acknowledged those concerns but said the debate should be 
> expanded to weigh the benefits and the risks of the 
> technology. Mr. Holliday addressed the controversy in a 
> carefully prepared speech to Boston College's Chief 
> Executives Club. The comments were part of an offensive 
> DuPont has launched at a time it is evolving from one of 
> the world's largest chemical companies into a "science" 
> company focused on biotechnology. Also this week, DuPont 
> announced a global television campaign to polish its image 
> as a company that views new technology as a way to solve 
> the world's problems. He said DuPont will be moving rapidly 
> away from using nonrenewable resources and by 2010 will 
> derive 25% of its revenue from biosources and by better 
> exploiting its scientific knowledge. Less than 5% of its 
> revenue comes from those sources now. But Mr. Holliday was 
> more vague on the question of whether foods should be 
> labeled to notify consumers that they contain genetically 
> modified ingredients. While advocating consumer choice, he 
> questioned the need for consumers to know the process by 
> which food is made. By stressing the potential benefits of 
> bioengineering, DuPont hopes to overcome public fears, much 
> as it did when it introduced Teflon-coated frying pans and 
> had to convince skeptical consumers that the technology 
> provided convenience without chemically contaminating food. 
> It is the same kind of problem "on a much larger scale," 
> Mr. Holliday said. (END) DOW JONES NEWS 09-22-99 09:27 PM 
> Copyright 1999 Dow Jones & Co., Inc. All rights reserved. 
> 
> Executive News Svc. 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> DuPont sets environmental, biotech goals BOSTON, Sept 22 
> (Reuters) - Seeking to reduce the chemical giant's impact 
> on the global environment, DuPont Co. (DD.N) Chairman and 
> Chief Executive Charles Holliday on Wednesday said the 
> company expects to derive 25 percent of its revenues in 2010 
> from non-depletable raw materials. Holliday, speaking at 
> Boston College's Chief Executives Club, said that in 1998 
> less than 5 percent of his company's sales came from 
> materials other than depletable raw materials, such as oil 
> or water. DuPont, the world's largest chemical company, 
> recently set a goal of sourcing 10 percent of its energy 
> needs from renewable sources such as solar power by the end 
> of 2010, versus almost none right now. "We have never made 
> a public long-term goal we didn't meet," Holliday told 
> reporters following his speech. Responding to consumer 
> concerns over genetically modified food products, 
> especially in Europe, Holliday said DuPont would, by the 
> beginning of 2000, launch a "global biotechnology panel" to 
> solicit the opinions of experts, including critics, on the 
> use of bioengineering. Food labeling is a sticky issue, 
> Holliday acknowledged. "We know the labeling subject is 
> important, and there should be dialogue around that 
> subject," he said. "The idea of labeling the process by 
> which something was made is a new area." 
> 
> Asked if he believed biotechnology was safe, Holliday 
> answered, "I believe this technology can be practiced 
> safely. I'm not sure if there's anything in the world that 
> is totally risk-free. The issue is can you practice the 
> technology safely, and what's the benefit of the 
> technology?" ! MORE !211 Executive News Svc. 
> 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> Farm issues key to WTO talks, US official says By Doug 
> Palmer WASHINGTON, Sept 22 (Reuters) - This autumn's world 
> trade talks could founder if countries are unwilling to 
> significantly reform their agricultural policies, U.S. 
> 
> Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman said on Wednesday. In 
> remarks to the President's Export Council, Glickman said 
> agriculture was the one issue that could "make or break" 
> the the wide-ranging negotiations, which are also expected 
> to cover trade in a wide range of service areas and 
> industrial tariffs. Protectionistic "feelings are so high" 
> in the agricultural sector that it could "thwart progress 
> in other areas," Glickman told the group, which advises the 
> Clinton administration on trade. The upcoming talks begin 
> Nov. 30 in Seattle with a meeting of the 134-nation World 
> Trade Organisation to set the scope of the negotiations. In 
> the last round of world trade talks, which ended in 1994, 
> countries agreed to resume negotiations on agriculture and 
> services by the end of this year. In the upcoming talks, 
> which are expected to last three years, the United States's 
> main agenda will be to increase foreign market access for 
> U.S. goods and services, U.S. Trade Representative Charlene 
> Barshefsky told the group. In the agriculture sector, that 
> means pushing for the elimination of export subsidies, 
> reductions in trade-distorting domestic subsidies and 
> strengthening rules for "state-trading enterprises," such 
> as the Canadian Wheat Board, which have a monopoly control 
> over exports, she said. The United States also wants to 
> reduce tariffs and regulatory barriers that impede U.S. 
> 
> farm exports and ensure that science-based rules govern 
> trade in genetically modified crops and other products of 
> biotechnology, Barshefsky said. European Union farm 
> ministers said last week they would defend the region's 
> Common Agricultural Policy, which includes a range of 
> export subsidies and price supports to help domestic 
> farmers. The EU has criticised U.S. export credits and 
> congressional approval of a $6 billion emergency bailout 
> for American farmers in 1998 as examples of the way in 
> which Washington hands out aid to farmers. While 
> agriculture will be "the heart of the new round," the 
> United States also wants significant reductions in 
> industrial tariffs and increased foreign market access for 
> service industries, Barshefsky said. "Whether it's telecom 
> services, financial services, distribution, construction 
> services, professional services -- you name it, we want to 
> see across-the-board further market openings," she said. 
> 
> Sen. Max Baucus, a Montana Democrat who serves on the 
> export council, said the Clinton administration has a 
> difficult task ahead. U.S. trade negotiators will face 
> strong opposition from the European Union on issues such as 
> genetically-modified crops, which have sparked European 
> consumer concerns, he said. At home, the Clinton 
> administration will have to deal with a Congress and public 
> that are increasingly sceptical of the value of trade 
> agreements, Baucus said. The EU's refusal to open its 
> market to U.S. beef from cattle raised with artificial 
> growth hormones, despite losing a WTO case on the issue, is 
> a case in point, said Sen. Tim Johnson, South Dakota 
> Democrat. The EU's continued ban is a "sore point" with 
> South Dakota cattle producers and illustrates the needs to 
> reform WTO dispute settlement procedures in the upcoming 
> talks, he said. ! MORE !221 Executive News Svc. 
> 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> <<GP>> 
> Houston Chronicle Jim Barlow Column By Jim Barlow, Houston 
> Chronicle Sep. 23--Recently, several readers chastised me 
> for remarks about Greenpeace, the environmental group. I 
> made fun of its British head for destroying a field of 
> genetically modified corn in that country. The readers 
> said, essentially, that Greenpeace was right. Genetically 
> modified crops, in their opinion, are dangerous. We should 
> ban them until they are proven safe. Well, the scientific 
> consensus is that genetically modified crops are no more, 
> and no less, dangerous than those developed by 
> cross-breeding or hybridization. In 1987, the National 
> Academy of Sciences said there was no evidence that any 
> unique hazards exist. In 1989, the National Research 
> Council found there is no difference between genetically 
> modified plants and microorganisms, whether they are 
> changed by classical methods or biotechnology. And just 
> this year, Britain's leading scientific journal, Nature, 
> editorialized that "as yet there is no substantial evidence 
> that these kinds of foods are inherently more dangerous 
> than conventional foods just because they have been 
> produced using novel technology." 
> 
> Essentially, those who campaign against biotechnology want 
> us to prove a negative -- which is impossible. Meanwhile 
> the world's population grows. Not in developed countries, 
> mind you. Here, births aren't meeting replacement rates. 
> 
> The only way the United States keeps growing is that we 
> are fortunate enough to attract immigrants. The huge 
> population growth is coming in less developed countries. 
> 
> And we can produce food enough to meet increased needs 
> through biotechnology. Increasing agricultural productivity 
> by 1.4 percent a year over the next 60 years will do it. 
> 
> Without biotechnology, we won't. More sorry than safe? The 
> outcry over genetically modified crops is part of a larger 
> problem -- the drive to eliminate risk in the world by 
> well-intentioned people. It's the precautionary principle, 
> or the "better safe than sorry" way of doing business. 
> 
> However, as Jonathan H. Adler, with the Competitive 
> Enterprise Institute points out, "adopting the 
> precautionary principle is likely to make us more sorry 
> than safe." 
> 
> The flap over corn is a good example of the problem. The 
> genetically modified corn not only produces much higher 
> yields, it also protects itself from its biggest pest, the 
> corn borer. Farmers have to use only about one-third of the 
> pesticides they used in the past. Farmworkers don't have to 
> handle as much of the pesticides, which provide significant 
> risks to them. Adler, writing in the journal of PERC, a 
> Montana-based organization that advocates market solutions 
> to environmental problems, cites several other examples of 
> the precautionary principle going wrong. In the early 
> 1990s, alarmed by reports that chlorine causes cancer, Peru 
> cut the chlorination of its water supply. The subsequent 
> outbreak of cholera in that country caused far more deaths 
> than were ever at risk from chlorine-induced cancer. The 
> Food and Drug Administration applies the precautionary 
> principle in evaluating new drugs. Yet victims of 
> life-threatening diseases face more danger from their 
> diseases than the side effects of new drugs. Ethylene 
> dibromide, a powerful fungicide used to prevent the growth 
> of molds in grain, is banned as a potential carcinogen. Yet 
> molds produce some of the most potent carcinogens found in 
> nature. The fungicide used to replace ethylene dibromide 
> has to be applied in greater quantities, increasing the 
> risk for exposed workers. We cannot eliminate risk in the 
> world unless we are satisfied with the status quo. Progress 
> involves risks. If we eliminate progress, then we must 
> accept that millions will starve and diseases that could be 
> conquered will continue to take lives. The poor of the 
> world will be condemned to their present situation. We can 
> only believe in arithmetic. We add up the risks and 
> benefits and go forward. If we are wrong about risks, we 
> cope -- and those who brought forward the new product or 
> risk pay for it with money. Otherwise, we find ourself 
> living that sour, little German fable about the rich 
> industrialist who so loved his only son that he kept him 
> away from all risks. The son lived in a pathogen-controlled 
> environment. He was kept away from all but a few people to 
> cut the risk of disease or bad influences. Finally, on his 
> 21st birthday he was at last allowed to step out of the 
> door of his father's mansion and confront the world. And 
> his heart stopped from the excitement. ----- Visit Houston 
> Chronicle Interactive on the World Wide Web at 
> http://www.HoustonChronicle.com (c) 1999, Houston 
> Chronicle. Distributed by Knight Ridder/Tribune Business 
> News. 
> 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> The Ottawa Citizen Thursday, September 23, 1999 Final 
> Business C1 / FRONT Biotech industry addresses skills 
> shortage BY Pauline Tam Canada's maturing biotechnology 
> industry is making a nationwide inventory of its talent 
> needs as a first step toward addressing a critical shortage 
> of skilled scientists, managers and technicians. The 
> federally funded Biotechnology Human Resources Council is 
> asking the country's estimated 282 biotech companies to 
> take part in a survey that identifies, for the first time, 
> specific skills and expertise which are in short supply. 
> 
> Information collected from the survey will form the basis 
> of a national training and recruiting strategy aimed at 
> alleviating the skills shortage, says Terrance Hunsley, 
> executive director of the Ottawa-based Biotechnology Human 
> Resources Council, founded two years ago to address the 
> industry's talent needs. According to a recent Statistics 
> Canada report, the biotech industry generated 12,000 jobs 
> last year but 2,000 of them remained unfilled. The sector 
> is made up of companies involved in genetic engineering for 
> drug discovery, agriculture, food processing, industrial 
> processing or fish farming. The majority of these firms 
> employ fewer than 50 people but appear to be hiring rapidly. 
> Still, past labour-market studies have shown that while 
> there is growing demand for skilled biotech workers, Canada 
> lacks the necessary talent pool to provide the people 
> needed to keep up with industry growth. ``It's not just 
> Canada's problem. It's the same situation in the U.S. The 
> experience base doesn't really exist anywhere because the 
> industry is so new,'' says Mr. Hunsley. By far the greatest 
> need across the country is for experienced senior 
> executives with a combination of business savvy and 
> scientific expertise. Also in short supply are lawyers 
> specializing in intellectual property rights and scientists 
> with an understanding of the federal regulatory system 
> governing food and drugs. In Ottawa-Carleton, the shortage 
> of skilled biotech workers will hit government laboratories 
> and universities particularly hard, says Ken Lawless, 
> executive director of the Ottawa Life Sciences Council. The 
> region's life-sciences industry employs more than 18,000 
> people, most of whom work in the public sector. But that 
> number is expected to double in the next two years, due in 
> part to a turnover in personnel as the leading edge of the 
> baby boom retires, the creation of new life sciences 
> companies, and an increase in health-research funding. As a 
> result, agencies such as the federal Health Protection 
> Branch and the Canadian Blood Services will be recruiting 
> more staff, creating a demand for skills ranging from 
> scientists with knowledge of the health regulatory system, 
> to hematologists and infectious disease specialists. New 
> research labs at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and 
> the Loeb Research Institute will also generate demand for 
> specialists in genetic and protein engineering, says Mr. 
> 
> Lawless. 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> Xinhua General News Service HEADLINE: safety first for 
> genetically -modified food: thailand DATELINE: bangkok, 
> september 23; ITEM NO: 0923097 BODY: thailand is taking a 
> "safety first" approach toward genetically -modified food ( 
> gmo) , the bangkok post thursday quoted an agriculture 
> ministry official as saying. the country will not become 
> involved in or promote the application of genetically 
> -modified organisms in food until scientists can come up 
> with solid evidence to prove that gmos are safe for 
> consumers and the environment, ampon kittiapon, permanent 
> secretary for agriculture, was quoted as saying. he also 
> said that thailand has no policy to promote modified food 
> and that rigorous studies will be made before there is any 
> change to this approach. it is reported that many local 
> importers require manufacturers to label their products as 
> free from gmos because of consumer worries. agriculture 
> officials and those of other departments concerned will 
> work together to test products and certify exports as free 
> from gmos. companies will be able to take part in the 
> program on a voluntary basis. analysts said thailand's 
> clear position on gmos would bring windfalls for exporters, 
> especially to markets with tough requirements such as the 
> european union and japan. LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: 
> September 23, 1999 [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> THE DAILY TELEGRAPH(LONDON) September 23, 1999, Thursday 
> SECTION: Pg. 02 LENGTH: 455 words HEADLINE: Menopause 
> reversed: Pioneer to quit Britain over biotech backlash 
> BYLINE: By Roger Highfield BODY: THE first successful ovary 
> graft is the last announcement that Prof Roger Gosden will 
> make as a scientist working in Britain. He is about to move 
> next month to McGill University's Royal Victoria Hospital 
> in Quebec, Canada. One reason for the departure of Prof 
> Gosden, 51, is the national backlash against biotechnology, 
> and evidence of a Government retreat in the face of this 
> "bioangst", notably when it blocked the use of "therapeutic 
> cloning" in which embryos are cloned to make tissue for 
> transplant. Similar fears were voiced last week at the 
> British Association for the Advancement of Science's annual 
> meeting by Sir Richard Sykes, chairman of GlaxoWellcome and 
> president of the association. Prof Gosden said: "With all 
> the fuss over GM food and so on, it is difficult to be a 
> scientist in Britain. One does not feel proud of being a 
> scientist any longer. And I fear it is very discouraging 
> for our young people." The current climate made it 
> increasingly difficult to attract the most promising 
> graduates to a scientific career and keep them. "I have 
> lost a number of really good people, future leaders in 
> academia, to industry and overseas. That really hurts." 
> 
> But he did hope to maintain his links with Britain after 
> joining the "brain drain" to Canada. "Not everything is 
> negative by any means," he said. Prof Gosden began his 
> research career in 1970 in Cambridge under Prof Robert 
> Edwards, who pioneered test tube baby technology with 
> Patrick Steptoe. After Prof Gosden had completed his PhD 
> and a postdoctoral project, he won a fellowship at Duke 
> University, North Carolina, where he studied the action of 
> hormones in the brain. In 1975 he returned to Cambridge and 
> shortly afterwards took up an appointment at the University 
> of Edinburgh Medical School where he remained until 1994. 
> 
> Subsequently, he became the first holder of the Chair of 
> Reproductive Biology in the School of Medicine, University 
> of Leeds, where he also directs research at the two 
> fertility units. Throughout his career, his principal 
> interest has been in the ovary and egg development and he 
> has popularised the field of reproductive science with two 
> books: Cheating Time, published three years ago, and 
> Designer Babies, which was published earlier this year. 
> 
> After conducting the first successful trial in 1994, Prof 
> Gosden became confident that human ovary grafts would work 
> in 1996, when a sheep, which had an ovary removed, frozen 
> and reimplanted, subsequently gave birth to a healthy lamb. 
> When he moves to Canada, Prof Gosden hopes to collaborate 
> with Prof Jonathan Tilly and colleagues at the Massachusetts 
> General Hospital, Boston, to improve the frozen storage and 
> transplantation of ovarian tissue for infertility 
> treatments. LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: September 23, 1999 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> THE DAILY TELEGRAPH(LONDON) September 23, 1999, Thursday 
> SECTION: Pg. 14 LENGTH: 413 words HEADLINE: Lib Dems at 
> Harrogate: Delegates back five-year freeze on GM crops 
> BYLINE: By George Jones and Polly Newtion BODY: A FIVE-year 
> ban on growing genetically modified crops was backed by the 
> Liberal Democrats yesterday. The party conference voted 
> overwhelmingly for a moratorium but stopped short of 
> supporting an outright ban on GM crops if they were found 
> to be incompatible with organic farming. Among those who 
> spoke in favour of the freeze was Charles Kennedy, the 
> Liberal Democrat leader, who insisted that such a policy 
> would not prevent research into GM technology. Heralding a 
> stronger emphasis by the Liberal Democrats on environmental 
> protection, Mr Kennedy said the party must be "bolder" in 
> its commitment to green issues. He said Labour had lost the 
> confidence of voters over genetic modification. "Because of 
> the disastrous mishandling by the Government of this policy 
> issue, people don't even trust 'trust-me' Tony," said Mr 
> Kennedy. "They don't trust him because they don't think 
> Cabinet ministers are telling them the truth." 
> 
> Norman Baker, Liberal Democrat MP for Lewes and the party's 
> chief spokesman on GM crops, said a five-year moratorium 
> would protect consumers and the environment. It was not, he 
> said, anti-science. Mr Baker added: "Liberal Democrats are 
> committed to taking decisions based on sound science. An 
> anti-science policy would be to rush ahead with the growing 
> of GM crops while the research was still being conducted." 
> 
> Lady Ludford, a Liberal Democrat peer, urged delegates to 
> support a permanent ban on the growing of GM crops if 
> research showed that they could not be cultivated without 
> cross- contamination of organic produce. The commitment to 
> "review" the policy in those circumstances was not strong 
> enough, she said. "Are we as a party really saying that, in 
> that event, we might decide in favour of GM and wipe out 
> organic farming?" Once organic farming had been destroyed 
> by GM crops, it could not be revived. Tim Farron, the 
> Liberal Democrats' prospective Parliamentary candidate for 
> Westmoreland and Lonsdale, urged the party not to bow to 
> the anti-GM lobby which, he said, was fuelled by "tabloid 
> hysteria and cynical populism" and run by "the reborn 
> Luddite movement". The motion backed by the conference 
> supported the labelling of all products containing GM 
> ingredients. It also supported the outlawing of gene 
> patenting and a continuation of the ban on human 
> reproductive cloning. Delegates asserted the right of 
> parties to receive donations from "anyone in the world" but 
> said that there should be full disclosure of large sums. 
> 
> LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: September 23, 1999 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> Health ministers set to approve tough GM food policy BODY: 
> GENETIC SYDNEY, Sept 23 AAP - Health ministers are set to 
> approve a hardline labelling regime for genetically modified 
> food, even if they contain only minute traces of GM 
> ingredients. All packaged GM food will have to be labelled 
> and wholly modified foods will have to be identified in 
> brand names. An example of this policy would be Brand X's 
> Genetically Modified Tomato Paste, the Sydney Morning 
> Herald reported today. GM frsh fruit and vegetables that 
> will be on the market in about five years also will have to 
> be labelled. However unlike laws being introduced in 
> Britain, restaurants and takeaways in Australia and New 
> Zealand will not have to declare whether their cooked foods 
> contain GM ingredients. Citing sources the paper says 10 
> Australian and New Zealand health ministers have agreed on 
> nearly all points of the policy. AAP cf/bwl LANGUAGE: 
> ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: September 22, 1999 [Entered 
> September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> Africa News September 23, 1999 SECTION: NEWS, DOCUMENTS & 
> COMMENTARY LENGTH: 639 words HEADLINE: Ethiopia; GM Crops 
> Are you for, against, or conveniently in the middle? 
> BYLINE: Berhe W. Aregay, The Monitor - Addis Ababa BODY: 
> Addis Ababa - Genetically Modified crops have generated 
> strong feelings both for and against. The quarrel has 
> nothing to do with taste or color or anything culinary. The 
> controversy has to do with the gene engineering that takes 
> place in GM foods, and which sets them apart from the 
> conventional crops that we make use of now. The stand-off 
> over these foods seems to be mostly in the US and Western 
> Europe. But no country that opens its borders to 
> globalization will miss out. It is possible then that 
> sooner than we think we could find GM foods in supermarkets 
> in Addis. In any case despite the row over them, these 
> foods' sales are growing. Let's briefly see the pros and 
> cons as expressed by their critics and supporters. In the 
> Red Corner. GM crops as seen by their enemies, such as 
> Green Peace. They (not necessarily Green Peace) call them 
> "Frankenstein foods", alluding to the man-made monster 
> character in a fiction book who wanted to destroy the 
> person who created him. People fear that by tampering with 
> nature, we could be heading towards an environmental 
> nightmare, that we might not be able to correct 
> later.(Remember Dolly, the cute man- bioengineere sheep?) 
> Also GM foods, with their genes "visited" by man could be 
> harmful to peoples' health in the long run. Opponents of GM 
> crops have come to be increasingly vocal, that people who 
> in the near past never even heard the name, are making 
> their baby foods free of genetically modified organisms. 
> 
> Recent events in Europe of contaminated chickens and Coke, 
> mad-cow disease, gave some credence to peoples' fears on 
> foods that multinational companies make; although in these 
> particular cases the foods weren't genetically modified. As 
> to the argument that GM foods are the harbingers of 
> bountiful earth in the future, its' critics say that there 
> isn't shortage of food in the world now, if only we could 
> know how to distribute it efficiently. In fact, they say, 
> if in the long run anybody is benefiting from GM food 
> technology, it will mainly be the big multinational 
> companies, and not the small farmers of the world. In the 
> Blue Corner. Proponents of GM crops. They say something 
> like this: Look here! Our scientists have always tampered 
> with plant genes, anyway. Isn't plant breeding a facet of 
> gene manipulation? What its critics are afraid of is facing 
> the unknown future. If so, too bad. But you can't stop the 
> future. Take computers. Weren't some people in the past 
> reluctant to give up their typewriters, not knowing what 
> computers can do for them. World population is large enough 
> already. The way it (population) is growing, the Earth will 
> not be able to grow conventionally food enough for 
> everyone. Period. The problem isn't with population size 
> only. So much destruction is going on in the way of 
> environmental degradation: large world fishing areas are 
> already over fished. Bio-diversity destruction is so 
> rampant that possibilities of finding " miracle" plants are 
> being reduced day by day. Irrigation, thought to be the 
> solution to problems created by drought and erratic 
> rainfall, isn't without its problems, what with salinity 
> and the cost involved. Soil erosion and land degradation is 
> serious and grows more so every year. All things considered 
> then, say these proponents, bio- genetic engineering might 
> be the last frontier in food production that must be 
> traveled. And what is wrong anyway, with cowboy-like 
> readiness crops that whenever an enemy approaches can fast 
> enough pop out their own herbicide and insecticide. Rice 
> crop of the future, while faithfully tasting like rice will 
> pump into your body all the vitamins and proteins etc. 
> 
> without you not even knowing it! And if anybody is 
> die-hard to the last to refuse to eat GM food, read the 
> label please and pass. Publication date: September 21, 1999 
> LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: September 23, 1999 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> Birmingham Post September 23, 1999, Thursday SECTION: Pg. 
> 24 LENGTH: 390 words HEADLINE: 'FRANKENSTEIN' FOOD HALTED 
> BY BRAKE AFTER MASS PANIC BYLINE: Robert Lindsay BODY: Pub 
> and restaurant food supplier Brake Bros yesterday announced 
> it had eliminated all genetically modified ingredients from 
> its products - just in time for this week's introduction of 
> menu labelling rules. Chief executive Mr Ian Player said: 
> "All caterers have to declare this week whether their food 
> contains GM products or not. There was a mass panic and we 
> had hundreds of calls from customers. "We were able to tell 
> them that we are GM free." 
> 
> He said the group had spent a year hunting new suppliers to 
> rid itself of 700 products in its 2,000 strong range which 
> contained GM oil and soya. He admitted that the group had 
> still to remove GM derivative products, but said: "We are 
> working on that and should have them removed within six 
> months." 
> 
> The Kent-based group is aiming to take market share from 
> the foodservice division of its larger rival Booker, which 
> it failed to buy in an auction earlier this year. Booker's 
> business was eventually bought by South African catering 
> group Bidvest. Mr Player said he was not concerned about 
> the extra firepower Bidvest would give his UK rival. "Its 
> main business is ambient food which is lower margin than 
> our main frozen food business. It's underperforming and it 
> is the same management running the business today that got 
> it into trouble." 
> 
> Brake Bros boosted its strength in ambient and chilled 
> foods last October with the purchase of the food service 
> business of Watson & Philip, the group that ran Alldays 
> convenience stores. Mr Player said the acquisition had 
> brought group operating margins in the half down from four 
> per cent to 3.8 per cent. However, margins from the core 
> frozen food businesses improved from six to seven per cent, 
> reflecting tighter cost controls and operating 
> efficiencies. He said he was still on the look out for 
> acquisitions to further bolster the group against falling 
> high street food prices and more powerful customers. 
> 
> "You're seeing consolidation going on amongst some of our 
> largest customers. You're seeing it happen all the time, 
> and inevitably the big will get bigger and the weak will 
> get weaker." 
> 
> The acquisition helped lift first-half operating profits 16 
> per cent to pounds 15.9 million. After an exceptional 
> disposal gain and goodwill amortisation, profits were up 23 
> per cent to 16.8 million. LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: 
> September 23, 1999 [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> THE HINDU September 23, 1999 SECTION: News LENGTH: 372 
> words HEADLINE: India- Need for regulatory mechanism in 
> biotechnology BODY: NEW DELHI, SEPT. 22. The Nobel 
> laureate, Dr. Richard R. Ernst, has come out strongly 
> against calls to ban research in the area of biotechnology 
> saying it would be criminal to do so. One cannot deprive 
> future generations of a tool for their survival, he says. 
> 
> But, at the same time, he has emphasised that those 
> working in the frontline area of science could not be given 
> total licence. One had to be careful to ensure there was no 
> adverse outcome. Human cloning, for instance, could not be 
> allowed as it could have dangerous repercussions, he added. 
> Making these remarks in an interview to the TheHindu, he 
> stressed that biotechnology was one area which was neither 
> black nor white and said that what was needed was a 
> regulatory mechanism that was both stringent and flexible - 
> stringent enough to prevent any misuse of the technology, 
> and adequately flexible to ensure that the developments in 
> the area of science was not unduly fettered. The regulatory 
> mechanism, he said, must be particularly strong in the 
> context of the growing global trend towards profit-making 
> which has not excluded science. With scientists becoming 
> more materialistic, ethical values were taking a back seat. 
> Something must be done to reverse the trend. Scientists 
> must be encouraged to take their social responsibility more 
> seriously, especially in a field such as biotechnology, he 
> said. The Nobel laureate, who is here to attend the 13th 
> international congress on biophysics organised under the 
> auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied 
> Biophysics, also emphasised the need for contigency plans to 
> take care of any accidental problems. " Biotechnology is 
> more unpredictable than earthquakes," he added. Dr. Ernst, 
> who won the Nobel prize in 1991 for his pioneering work on 
> nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, also 
> predicted that developing countries such as India would in 
> the coming years take the lead over the developed world in 
> terms of developments in the area of biotechnology. This, 
> he said, would be mainly because scientists in developing 
> countries faced less public resistance than their 
> counterparts in Europe and other parts of the developed 
> world. Copyright 1999: The Hindu. All Rights Reserved. 
> 
> LANGUAGE: English LOAD-DATE: September 23, 1999 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> THE HINDU September 23, 1999 SECTION: News LENGTH: 2389 
> words HEADLINE: Agenda for action BODY: The science summit 
> held in Bangalore in August 1999 discussed a variety of 
> crucial issues affecting science and technology and 
> national development. The challenges of the future are 
> indeed formidable, demanding focussed effort to meet these 
> challenges. We need to sharply tune our programmes in 
> science and technology to satisfy the minimum basic needs 
> of the common man and promote sustainable development. We 
> also need to concentrate on efforts in a few priority areas 
> related to science and technology, innovation and industrial 
> competitiveness, where India can create a global niche. 
> 
> India has to become a world leader at least in a few areas 
> of basic sciences as well as technology. In addition, we 
> have to satisfy the crucial infrastructure needs in areas 
> such as energy, transportation and education. Out of such 
> pragmatic efforts would emerge an India, which is 
> economically sound and where social justice prevails. Much 
> of the accomplishments would become possible only if the 
> administration and management of science and of the country 
> are thoroughly revamped. Some of the priority 
> recommendations of the Summit are highlighted in this 
> agenda for action. Basic needs and sustainable development 
> A strategy for sustainable development will have to be 
> developed by having an integrated approach to planning, 
> financing and management. Out of this should emerge 
> programmes which provided not only the basic needs such as 
> food, safe drinking water, shelter and so on, but also the 
> all-needed employment or livelihood opportunities 
> particularly in the rural sector. All the programmes 
> related to basic needs must clearly establish indicators of 
> environmental, social and economic sustainability. It is 
> necessary to form consortia of institutions in each 
> ecoregion of the country, making use of ecoregional maps. 
> 
> Such consortia could include all universities, technical 
> institutions, civil society organisations and extension and 
> credit agencies which could provide a single window 
> technical support system. Of the various important tasks, 
> high priority should be assigned for providing drinking 
> water and for attaining higher productivity per unit of 
> land and water through eco-technologies developed by 
> blending modern technologies, and traditional know- how. 
> 
> The productivity of dry-land farming of crops such as 
> millets and pulses need to be improved. Opportunities are 
> available to achieve a doubling of pulses production using 
> technologies on the shelf. Non-farm livelihood security has 
> to be improved through the adoption of alternative 
> technology-based mass consumption, such as eco- friendly 
> building materials and construction, food processing, 
> renewable energy, water, sanitation etc. In order to 
> provide the much needed focus and adequate thrust for 
> sustainable development, a Sustainable Technology Board be 
> constituted jointly by all concerned scientific agencies. 
> 
> Such a Board can help to achieve synergy and convergence 
> among all on-going programmes relating to environmental, 
> social and economic development. Infrastructure requirements 
> including education In order to ensure that the haphazard 
> development of infrastructure is remedied, attention has to 
> be paid to important aspects such as reliability, 
> professional management of infrastructure areas, promotion 
> of environmentally sound practices, re-training of workers 
> and managers and so on. It is necessary to work out 
> completely new strategies for infrastructure in areas such 
> as transportation, which should include new strategies in 
> air transportation, pollution -free vehicles and mass 
> transport systems, including proper use of waterways and of 
> the coast line. Education must be treated as an important 
> infrastructure element, because without a sound base in 
> education at all levels, other sectors cannot grow in the 
> country. It is hightime that at least a few of our 
> institutions are comparable to the best elsewhere in the 
> world. There are many important aspects of the education 
> sector that need immediate attention. Some of these are: * 
> Maintain the growth rate of literacy at about 10% per year 
> till 2005. * Make school environment conductive to reduce 
> drop out rate and also at the same time promote vocational 
> channel training schemes after the school level. * Proper 
> utilization of distant education has to be made to take 
> care of the vast demand on the educational system. * It is 
> high time that a flexible system of education including the 
> semester system and continuous evaluation of students are 
> introduced nationally at least at the level of higher 
> education. * Allocate 6 per cent of GNP for education as 
> recommended by the various national education policies 
> announced earlier. * There should be no dichotomy between 
> higher education and primary education and both require 
> equal support. The higher education (university) system has 
> to be liberated from the archaic administrative system and 
> governing structures. * The infrastructure of universities 
> for science and engineering education and research has to 
> be improved with a sense of urgency. This would require 
> around Rs. 200 crores per annum for the next 20 years. * 
> The programmes and plans of the various national academic 
> authorities such as UGC, AICTE, NCTE, IMC, etc. should be 
> coordinated by a National Board of Higher Education. 
> 
> Critical technologies Critical technologies that will give 
> the country a niche and competitive edge need to be 
> identified and fully supported. Of these, the areas of 
> information technology are vital ones. In the area of 
> information technology, we have to make full use of the new 
> opportunities provided by combining it with the drastic 
> reformulation and reorientation of the structures and 
> functions of our institutions and organisations, at the same 
> time avoiding various pitfalls which are readily recognized. 
> The areas for immediate attention in information technology 
> are: a vast enhancement of the information infrastructure 
> (e.g. networking); development of high-end software 
> capabilities; much greater emphasis on hardware 
> development; development of cheap no-frills computers, and 
> incorporation of local language and content in computers 
> and internet applications, to enable all sections of 
> society (including rural areas) to obtain the benefits of 
> information technology. Information technology should be 
> widely used in administration to promote transparency and 
> efficiency of governance. In the area of biotechnology, 
> there is need for greater coordination of programmes and 
> for exploring ways of connecting the research-end to the 
> product-end by establishing a suitable mechanism such as an 
> autonomous corporation. Public concerns relating to the 
> environmental, nutritional and social hazards associated 
> with genetically modified organisms ( GMOs) should be 
> addressed through multi stake holders, policy guidance and 
> monitoring bodies capable of undertaking dispassionate 
> benefit- risk analysis. Technological innovation and 
> industrial competitiveness Innovation and creation of 
> wealth through innovation have to get greater recognition 
> as important tools of development. We need to network all 
> our knowledge pool and all our resources to facilitate 
> invention and innovation and build formidable intellectual 
> assets, which will give India a dominant global position. 
> 
> In the world of knowledge based competition, intellectual 
> property rights will emerge as a key strategic tool. 
> 
> Industrial investment on R&D will have to be increased, 
> both quantitatively (it is around 0.7 per cent of sales 
> turnover today) and qualitatively (by investing not in 
> mundane products but in emerging cutting edge technologies). 
> However, preparedness in issues linked to intellectual 
> property is rather poor. A stronger physical & intellectual 
> infrastructure on IP, rigorous enforcement structure, 
> greater public awareness (including academia and business), 
> new reward systems need to be set up to reap the benefits 
> from the emerging intellectual property paradigms. Patents 
> will be strategic tools in industry's competitiveness & 
> higher levels of investments in generalising & utilising 
> patent portfolios will need a thrust. Networking of 
> knowledge and infrastructure facilities to promote a 
> synergistic and cooperative effort between industry, 
> educational institutions and research laboratories should 
> assume a priority. Through proper planning and judicious 
> support, it should be possible for India to become an R&D 
> capital of the world by promoting not only national R&D 
> effort but also providing opportunities for international 
> investment for R&D to be carried out in India. We need a 
> dual approach, in promoting individual innovators as well 
> as large consortia. Thus, special measures should be taken 
> to promote 'technopreneurship' among the individual 
> innovators. Supporting innovations by risk financing through 
> venture capital funding can create 'Indian Silicon 
> Valleys'. On the other hand, in the consortia approach, R&D 
> corporations should be set up both at national and at 
> state/ regional levels, where research institutions and 
> universities will be major share holders and about 25% of 
> the shares would be reserved for industries. The R&D 
> corporations could undertake consultancy and sponsored 
> research backed by the entire S&T community and 
> institutions. Equally important is a national system of 
> innovation, of which science and technology is only one 
> component. Innovation in India's Social & Economic 
> institutions, in the system of their governance is as 
> crucial as innovation in the products and production 
> processes of economy. A National Innovation Policy, which 
> invites a creative participation of every individual in 
> nation building has to be launched. Just as we had launched 
> a Freedom movement, let us launch a second freedom movement 
> or an Innovation Movement to build the new India of our 
> dreams. Funding of Science Every effort should be made to 
> increase the funding for science to about 2% of the GNP in 
> the next 4-5 years, the present funding having declined 
> from the level of over 1 per cent (1989) to 0.83 (1998). 
> 
> Investment in basic science needs to be stepped up 
> urgently. The present level of funding of basic scientific 
> research is around 100-150 crores, which should be doubled 
> in the next two years. In order to make sure that the 
> research funding is administered properly by paying 
> attention to priority areas and also provide the necessary 
> support to the entire scientific community by adopting 
> innovative policies and programmes, a National Science and 
> Engineering Research Board (NSERB), should be established, 
> along the lines of the National Science Foundation of the 
> U.S./China. Various Government Departments and agencies as 
> well as industry could contribute funds to NSERB. One of 
> the responsibilities of NSERB would be continuously monitor 
> and watch the emerging frontiers of science and 
> engineering, to bring out an annual report of national S&T 
> indicators and to benchmark Indian S&T in the framework of 
> global S&T. Attracting talent Science and Engineering is 
> attracting little talent nowadays for research and higher 
> studies. It is a matter of grave concern that many of the 
> science departments at undergraduate level are being closed 
> down for lack of interest by the younger generation in 
> science. This may lead to a crisis situation, since our 
> very best young minds need to take up science and 
> engineering as a career. It may not be enough if we just 
> provide opportunities for young people to visit 
> laboratories or to receive some training. An attractive 
> career development programme for scientists and engineers 
> needs to be designed and implemented. We should explore 
> every means to attract the best students for science and 
> engineering. It is well known that wherever suitable 
> facilities, an intellectually stimulating environment and 
> adequate amenities (such as an apartment) are provided, 
> young people have always been prepared to work in India 
> with great dedication and success. We need to recognise 
> that it is not the physical income alone but it is the 
> psychic income that is important for these young people. 
> 
> Management of Science Management and administrative 
> practices employed today in our institutions are not 
> conducive for promoting science. The bureaucratic hurdles 
> are retarding progress in most institutions and so are 
> political interferences. Empowering the scientific 
> institutions by making them truly autonomous and recreating 
> that institutional culture and ethos, where individual 
> scientists can experience the joy and beauty of science, 
> think in an uninhibited fashion and have opportunities to 
> perform are essential. Systems that are responsible and 
> caring, especially to the needs of young scientists, need 
> to be built by overhauling the entire machinery of 
> administration and procedures. General administration in 
> the government needs a major change. Generalists can no 
> longer govern all branches of the government. This is 
> specially so in the science departments, which have to cope 
> with exponentially expanding knowledge and respond to it. 
> 
> Tools of information technology have to be increasingly 
> employed in administration to minimize the drudgery and 
> bureaucracy and increase the transparency and efficiency. 
> 
> Science advisory mechanism for the Government Ever since 
> India got freedom, there has been a national science 
> advisory mechanism to the government and the Prime Minister. 
> It is important to see that a such a mechanism exists, at 
> all times, in order to help take balanced decisions with 
> respect to various crucial aspects of science and 
> technology as well as in areas where S&T inputs are 
> necessary for the government to take appropriate decisions. 
> A Science Advisory Committee to the Cabinet (SACC) should be 
> established by every government in power, together with a 
> Cabinet Committee on Science and Technology. The 
> recommendations of SACC should go directly to the Cabinet 
> Committee on Science & Technology for consideration and 
> decision. Such as advisory mechanism will enable the 
> government to come out with a bold and visionary policy and 
> programmes in science and technology. C. Subramaniam 
> Copyright 1999: The Hindu. All Rights Reserved. LANGUAGE: 
> English LOAD-DATE: September 23, 1999 [Entered 
> September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> BUSINESS LINE September 23, 1999 SECTION: Business LENGTH: 
> 397 words HEADLINE: India- KCP plans foray into biotech 
> BODY: Our Bureau CHENNAI, Sept.22 KCP Ltd is considering a 
> foray into biotechnology while deciding against putting up 
> a pesticide plant, according to Mr. V. L. Dutt, Chairman 
> and Managing Director of the company. Addressing 
> shareholders at the company's annual general meeting here 
> on Wednesday, he said that the pesticide project had been 
> dropped because of environmental considerations. The company 
> is looking at a proposal to enter biotech through a project 
> for making enzymes, he added. Regarding the ongoing 
> operations, Mr. Dutt said that the engineering and sugar 
> operations have suffered due to the recessionary trend and 
> adverse policies governing them. The company's overseas 
> subsidiary KCP Vietnam Industries Ltd's sugar mill had 
> started operations earlier this year. It has crushed 65,000 
> tonnes till May, and will likely require two more seasons 
> before achieving full crushing capacity of 2,500 tonnes per 
> day. While plantation sugar was produced this season, the 
> Vietnam unit's refined sugar facility, which is already in 
> place, will go onstream during the next season. On the Rs. 
> 
> 6-crore investment in the sugar facility near Kalahasti, 
> Andhra Pradesh, Mr. Dutt said that the unit has crushed 4.5 
> lakh tonnes with a sugar recovery of 8.8 per cent. It is 
> likely to yield returns in another two years. The cement 
> facility, Ramakrishna Cement, Macherla was being modernised. 
> With all the five mini-hydel projects having begun 
> operations, the power cost was likely to drop. The five 
> hydel units produced 1,50,000 units per day, about 80 per 
> cent of their capacity. The investment of Rs. 48 crores on 
> these facilities is envisaged to yield 20 per cent on a "10 
> year cycle", he added. The drop in cement prices had 
> affected operations in the first quarter of the current 
> year, while subsequent firming up of price between July and 
> August had helped to stabilise the situation. But with the 
> September off-take again dropping, and the continued 
> recessionary trend in capital goods sector, any recovery 
> may be hoped for only in the second half of next year, he 
> said. Shareholders at the AGM passed a resolution declaring 
> a 25 per cent dividend. The company reported a profit after 
> tax of Rs. 3.18 crores on a gross income of Rs. 192.35 
> crores during the year ended March 31, 1999. Copyright 
> 1999: Business Line. All Rights Reserved. LANGUAGE: English 
> LOAD-DATE: September 23, 1999 [Entered September 
> 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> The Guardian (London) September 23, 1999 SECTION: Guardian 
> Home Pages; Pg. 6 HEADLINE: Commons caterers serve up GM 
> embarrassment for Blair BYLINE: Nicholas Watt Political 
> Correspondent BODY: Nicholas Watt Political Correspondent 
> Tony Blair's efforts to encourage the development of 
> genetically modified food suffered a setback yesterday with 
> the announcement that GM products will no longer be served 
> at the Palace of Westminster. A notice, displayed 
> prominently in canteens around the palace, announced that 
> the use of GM food would be 'avoided wherever possible'. 
> 
> Sue Harrison, the director of the Commons refreshment 
> department, said that she had decided to act because of 
> general unease about GM foods. Ms Harrison, who has asked 
> suppliers to provide non-GM foods, added that she was 
> making no judgment about the foods but was merely 
> responding to demand. Her statement, which follows the 
> decision of the Commons all- party catering committee to 
> give the refreshment department a free hand over whether to 
> serve GM food, will be an embarrassing reminder to the 
> prime minister of widespread disquiet over GM food. Mr 
> Blair has called for people to 'keep an open mind' on the 
> issue. Dennis Turner, the Labour chairman of the Commons 
> catering committee, indicated last night that he was taken 
> by surprise by yesterday's announcement. 'The director of 
> catering will want to bring a report to the next meeting of 
> the catering committee,' Mr Turner said. 'She will 
> presumably want to justify to us the decision.' 
> 
> MPs were also surprised by the decision because they 
> thought that the refreshment department was concentrating 
> on meeting the government's target of labelling GM food by 
> the end of this month. The prime minister, who has 
> criticised opponents of GM food for exaggerating the 
> dangers, has argued powerfully for research trials to be 
> allowed to continue. In his most recent comments he said 
> that genetic modification could be the leading science of 
> the next century. 'All I say to people is: just keep an 
> open mind and let us proceed according to genuine 
> scientific evidence,' Mr Blair said during the summer. 
> 
> LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: September 23, 1999 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> The Guardian (London) September 23, 1999 SECTION: Guardian 
> Home Pages; Pg. 11 HEADLINE: Kennedy talks tough on GM food; 
> Environment BYLINE: Lucy Ward Political Correspondent BODY: 
> Links <http://www.libdems.org.uk/conference>www.libdems.org.uk/conference/
Lucy Ward Political 
> Correspondent Liberal Democrat leader Charles Kennedy 
> yesterday condemned the government's 'disastrous 
> mishandling" of the row over genetically modified foods as 
> his party stepped up pressure for a five-year moratorium on 
> commercial planting of GM crops. In a debate at the party's 
> Harrogate conference, Mr Kennedy urged his party to be 
> bolder over its commitment to the environment and sought to 
> reassure doubters that a planting ban would not prevent 
> research into GM technology. Science should be the servant 
> of humanity but never its master, he said. The brief speech 
> was being used by party strategists as an opportunity to 
> showcase Mr Kennedy and underline his determination to 
> highlight environmental issues in the wake of suggestions 
> by health spokesman Simon Hughes that the leader was weak 
> on policy formation. Lib Dems also believe they can exploit 
> the government's relatively tolerant stance on GM foods and 
> crops for political gain in the face of strong public 
> scepticism over the role of genetic modification. Mr 
> Kennedy told delegates: 'Because of the disastrous 
> mishandling by the government of this policy issue, people 
> don't even trust 'Trust me' Tony. They don't trust him 
> because they don't think cabinet ministers are telling them 
> the truth." 
> 
> Reconnecting disaffected voters with the political process 
> is another key theme which the new leader intends to press 
> home in the run-up to the next election. As some delegates 
> expressed reservations over a commercial growth moratorium, 
> Mr Kennedy acknowledged that some green policies could 
> prove unpopular. But he called for more boldness on 
> environmental commitment, saying the Liberal Democrats must 
> be 'watertight" on the issue. Norman Baker, Lib Dem 
> environmental spokesman and chief campaigner on GM issues, 
> underlined Mr Kennedy's insistence that the party was not 
> 'anti -science". In a speech punctuated by cheers, he said: 
> 'Let us be clear - a moratorium is not an anti-science 
> policy, it is a pro- science policy. An anti-science policy 
> would be to rush ahead with the growing of GM crops whilst 
> the research was still being conducted." 
> 
> The conference supported a motion reinforcing its call for 
> a five-year moratorium on the commercial growing of GM 
> crops, which it claimed would allow time for research on 
> the long-term environmental and health consequences and a 
> full and informed public debate. The motion supported 
> labelling of GM products or in gredients, outlawing the 
> patenting of genes and maintaining the ban on human 
> reproductive cloning. It called for a balance to be struck 
> between animal welfare and the gaining of medical and other 
> benefits from genetic techniques involving animals. But a 
> move to ban GM crops if research during the moratorium 
> indicated they would render organic cultivation impossible 
> was defeated. LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: September 23, 
> 1999 [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> The Independent (London) September 23, 1999, Thursday 
> SECTION: BUSINESS; Pg. 22 LENGTH: 754 words HEADLINE: CITY 
> DIARY BYLINE: John Willcock BODY: A RECENT speech by Sir 
> John Browne, chief executive of BP Amoco, to his senior 
> managers titled "The Road to a Successful Merger of British 
> Petroleum and Amoco", has become an unlikely hit on the 
> Internet. When you punch in the web address for the speech, 
> a key word from Sir John flashes up on screen - accompanied 
> immediately by a voiceover by Billy Connolly, the Scottish 
> comedian. Sir John has skilfully "sampled" a sketch using 
> Mr Connolly's characterisitically salty language. First to 
> flash up is "Performance". To which Mr Connolly's voice 
> says: "I want more of this." Then "Return on Capital 
> employed". To which he choruses: "More of that." 
> 
> And more of the same, until Sir John mentions "Net Cash 
> Flow", to which Mr Connolly adds: "and f...ing all of 
> that." So it goes on: "Personnel reductions"; "F...ing more 
> of that." 
> 
> "Sense of Urgency". "We want it now. I want it f...ing more 
> tomorrow." Finally the oil boss come to "Flexibility"; 
> "Then our demands will all be changed so f...ing stay 
> awake." 
> 
> A bravely down-to-earth approach by Sir John. Just one 
> thought. When I rang Billy Connolly's management company 
> yesterday, asking whether BP had asked permission to use his 
> voice, they said they hadn't heard about it and were looking 
> into it. On the other hand, it wasn't BP who put Sir John's 
> "Connolly-ised" speech on to the Net in the first place. A 
> BP spokesman would not be drawn on the subject, except to 
> murmur: "We're all great admirers of Billy Connolly." 
> 
> A MISSIVE from the Institute of Directors (IoD) reaches me 
> concerning a report it is publishing: "The report, 'Seeds of 
> Discontent: The Business of Genetically Modified Food', 
> backs recent statements by the Prime Minister and Sir 
> Richard Sykes, chairman of SmithKline Beecham..." 
> Interesting. I wonder if this Sir Richard Sykes is any 
> relation to the Sir Richard Sykes who is chairman of 
> another pharmaceuticals group, Glaxo Wellcome.... 
> 
> ASIL NADIR is back. At least, he'll be back on our 
> bookshelves soon if Bilge Nevzat, the Polly Peck boss's 
> younger sister, has anything to do with it. Ms Nevzat, a 
> former beauty queen and the disgraced businessman's 
> confidante, has penned a tome, The Turquoise Conspiracy, 
> which claims that Polly Peck's collapse from pounds 2bn 
> Eighties stock market star to bankruptcy was caused by a 
> British Establishment plot. The book's blurb declares: 
> "Nadir - one of the UK's wealthiest men, courted by Tory 
> politicians - was bankrupted and charged with fraud. But 
> his long- drawn -out prosecution and sensational escape to 
> North Cyprus left a mass of unanswered questions." 
> 
> It certainly does. Like why did he flee criminal charges 
> involving pounds 30m five years ago, instead of staying to 
> face trial? The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) is still willing 
> to take Mr Nadir to court to face these charges if he ever 
> does return to the UK. On the other hand, Ms Nevzat says: 
> "At the centre of the controversy set out here are the 
> widely discredited Serious Fraud Office and the political 
> establishment". Ms Nevzat adds: "It is a story that more 
> than 23,000 shareholders are waiting to read." They may be, 
> but I'm not sure they'll be that interested in her version. 
> LUKE JOHNSON, whose Belgo group has been bringing Belgian 
> beer to the Brits, has joined with a group of fellow 
> entrepreneurs to launch an ambitious "hi -tech incubator and 
> investment fund". The parties are putting in pounds 10m 
> initially to invest in UK internet and other hi-tech 
> businesses, and then intend to float the fund in 3 months 
> time, with a target valuation for the fund in six months of 
> pounds 100m. Obviously they don't think the Net bubble has 
> burst quite yet. The other parties are GlobalNet 
> Financial.com (which is producing Freeserve's ukinvest 
> service) and venture capital house NewMedia Investors, as 
> well as Michael Whittaker, the former chief executive of 
> Collins Stewart. The new venture will be called NewMedia 
> SPARK. THE INTERNET with its geekspeak may be the worst 
> sector for spawning weird new words and phrases, but the 
> venture capital scene is catching up fast, according to 
> Peter Temple in his new book Private Equity (John Wiley and 
> Sons). There is the Bingo (buy-in growth opportunity) that 
> can become a Dingo (dud investment - no growth 
> opportunity), while a Bimbo (buy-in, management buyout) can 
> transmute into a Bambi (bloody awful management buy-in) 
> which may - like the Colombo (colosally overpriced 
> management buyout) - require a Rambo (rescue after 
> management buyout). GRAPHIC: Nevzat: All a British plot 
> LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: September 23, 1999 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> The Independent (London) September 23, 1999, Thursday 
> SECTION: BUSINESS; Pg. 10 LENGTH: 312 words HEADLINE: LIB 
> DEM CONFERENCE: BLAIR 'HAS FAILED TO QUELL ANXIETY ON GM 
> FARMING'; KENNEDY SPEECH BYLINE: Sarah Schaefer BODY: 
> CHARLES KENNEDY reasserted his party's green credentials 
> yesterday by convincing sceptical delegates of the need for 
> tougher controls on genetically modified (GM) crops and 
> food. Mr Kennedy, in his first speec to the conference as 
> leader, urged the party to be "bolder" in its approach to 
> the environment and back calls to impose a five -year 
> moratorium on growing GM crops for commercial use. In a 
> personal attack on Tony Blair, he said the Prime Minister 
> had failed to quell "the legitimate public anxiety" over 
> the controversial science. "Science should be a servant of 
> society. It must never be a master of society. After the 
> disastrous handling of this issue the public do not even 
> trust 'trust me Tony'," Mr Kennedy said. He stressed that 
> environmental issues should be "an absolutely fundamental 
> issue" for the party. "It has always been central but we 
> have to go further. We have to be bold in our approach," he 
> said. However, Mr Kennedy faced criticism from several 
> activists who warned the party not to let "hysteria triumph 
> over common sense and scientific evidence". Tim Farron, of 
> Westmoreland and Lonsdale, spoke of the "wilful and 
> incorrect" information that had characterised the debate 
> during the past two years. "A moratorium would be an 
> unnecessary and unworthy concession to tabloid hysteria," 
> he added. But the party later backed the new policy motion 
> to protect organic and other non-GM crops in neighbouring 
> fields by subjecting them to much bigger isolation 
> distances. They should also be monitored by independent 
> assessors rather than biotechnology companies running the 
> experiments. The motion called for a statutory legal 
> liability without time limitation on the producers of GM 
> products for any adverse health or environmental effects. 
> 
> Earlier, delegates backed an emergency motion on the 
> British farming crisis. GRAPHIC: Charles Kennedy speaking 
> at the Liberal Democrat conference in; Harrogate yesterday 
> John Voos LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: September 23, 1999 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> The Independent (London) September 23, 1999, Thursday 
> SECTION: BUSINESS; Pg. 10 LENGTH: 657 words HEADLINE: LIB 
> DEM CONFERENCE: KENNEDY'S ROUSED RABBLE POLITICALLY 
> MODIFIES THE FOOD DEBATE; THE SKETCH BYLINE: Thomas 
> Sutcliffe BODY: SOME OF the motions at the Liberal Democrat 
> conference are not exactly testing challenges to the 
> pundit's powers of foresight. It's true that delegates have 
> an unusual appetite for deciding nothing, rather than 
> deciding something imperfect - which results in a high 
> number of motions unexpectedly returned to sender - but 
> there are still issues on the agenda that appear virtually 
> delegate-proof. Even in a party this wedded to the idea 
> that the good is the enemy of the perfect, it seemed 
> vanishingly unlikely that they would vote against the 
> reconstruction of Kosovo or in favour of hate-crimes. I had 
> wrongly assumed that the debate on GM food might fall into 
> the same category - given that the issue was perfectly 
> engineered to arouse activists' mistrust of big business 
> and technological determinism. The early speakers confirmed 
> initial suspicions. "We wouldn't be able to put the gene 
> back in the bottle", punned one, urging delegates to 
> toughen up the proposed moratorium on commercial growing of 
> GM crops. The next added to the sense of global corporate 
> conspiracy against our digestive systems, by revealing the 
> existence of the Codex Alimentarius, a little- known 
> international body that governs food safety rules. The name 
> suited the general paranoia perfectly; its members sounded 
> as if they gather at night in disused quarries, wearing 
> monks' cowls and executing any hapless tourists who stumble 
> on their dark machinations. But then Tim Farron came to the 
> podium. The motion was driven by "reckless, inaccurate, 
> craven populism" he said. It was a surrender to "tabloid 
> hysteria", evidence of a "reborn Luddite movement". I 
> braced myself for mad -cow moos of disapproval, but the 
> hall listened thoughtfully to his tirade. And when he 
> slammed down his final soundbite ("I refuse to accept that 
> knowledge should be a banned ingredient") they actually 
> applauded. Other like-minded speakers followed. 
> 
> "One-quarter of our genes are the same as those of the 
> cabbage", announced Veronica Watkins, making the point that 
> nature herself takes a liberal view of genetic 
> modification. "Fortunately the other three- quarters make 
> most of us different". The "most of" was rather pointed, 
> given that she was swimming against the general tide of 
> prejudice, but the delegates all chuckled indulgently. If 
> there was a brassica tendency in the hall, everyone clearly 
> thought it was seated elsewhere. It wasn't all going the 
> dissidents' way but there were plenty of them and, by my 
> admittedly partial assessment, the mood of the delegates 
> seemed finely balanced between rejection and approval. Then 
> one speaker swung the conference squarely behind the motion 
> again. In the "offices held" section of his speaker's card 
> Charles Kennedy had written "Leader of Party". It was, said 
> the session chairman proudly, striking evidence of the 
> egalitarian nature of the Liberal Democrats. It would have 
> been more striking still if Mr Kennedy hadn't been called, 
> or if he'd been rebuked for over-running his allotted five 
> minutes - but then there are limits to democracy. Earlier 
> Dr Evan Harris had warned the delegates: "Do not fall into 
> the trap of being led by tabloid scaremongering". Mr 
> Kennedy, by contrast, thought the populist bandwagon looked 
> a perfectly sensible way to travel: "The consumer and 
> citizen is king" he reminded delegates, and, what's more, 
> "we've got to be bolder in our commitment to the 
> environment". In this case, oddly, boldness takes the form 
> of being cautious to the point of paralysis, but that's 
> neither here nor there. Mr Kennedy's stage-managed 
> intervention was high-minded in its tone but at heart it 
> was an appeal for the party to behave politically not 
> rationally, to put public prejudice before private 
> knowledge. In a nice Freudian slip an anti-GM speaker had 
> earlier begged delegates to "vote for the emotion". After 
> Mr Kennedy's canny bit of rabble-rousing, they did so 
> overwhelmingly. LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: September 23, 
> 1999 [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> The Independent (London) September 23, 1999, Thursday 
> SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 10 LENGTH: 657 words HEADLINE: LIB DEM 
> CONFERENCE: THE SKETCH: MOMENT OF REASON PASSES AND LUDDITE 
> HYSTERIA WINS THE DAY BYLINE: Thomas Sutcliffe BODY: SOME 
> OF the motions at the Liberal Democrat conference are not 
> exactly testing challenges to the pundit's powers of 
> foresight. It's true that delegates have an unusual 
> appetite for deciding nothing, rather than deciding 
> something imperfect - which results in a high number of 
> motions unexpectedly returned to sender - but there are 
> still issues on the agenda that appear virtually 
> delegate-proof. Even in a party this wedded to the idea 
> that the good is the enemy of the perfect, it seemed 
> vanishingly unlikely that they would vote against the 
> reconstruction of Kosovo or in favour of hate-crimes. I had 
> wrongly assumed that the debate on GM food might fall into 
> the same category - given that the issue was perfectly 
> engineered to arouse activists' mistrust of big business 
> and technological determinism. The early speakers confirmed 
> initial suspicions. "We wouldn't be able to put the gene 
> back in the bottle", punned one, urging delegates to 
> toughen up the proposed moratorium on commercial growing of 
> GM crops. The next added to the sense of global corporate 
> conspiracy against our digestive systems, by revealing the 
> existence of the Codex Alimentarius, a little- known 
> international body that governs food safety rules. The name 
> suited the general paranoia perfectly; its members sounded 
> as if they gather at night in disused quarries, wearing 
> monks' cowls and executing any hapless tourists who stumble 
> on their dark machinations. But then Tim Farron came to the 
> podium. The motion was driven by "reckless, inaccurate, 
> craven populism" he said. It was a surrender to "tabloid 
> hysteria", evidence of a "reborn Luddite movement". I 
> braced myself for mad -cow moos of disapproval, but the 
> hall listened thoughtfully to his tirade. And when he 
> slammed down his final soundbite ("I refuse to accept that 
> knowledge should be a banned ingredient") they actually 
> applauded. Other like-minded speakers followed. 
> 
> "One-quarter of our genes are the same as those of the 
> cabbage", announced Veronica Watkins, making the point that 
> nature herself takes a liberal view of genetic 
> modification. "Fortunately the other three- quarters make 
> most of us different". The "most of" was rather pointed, 
> given that she was swimming against the general tide of 
> prejudice, but the delegates all chuckled indulgently. If 
> there was a brassica tendency in the hall, everyone clearly 
> thought it was seated elsewhere. It wasn't all going the 
> dissidents' way but there were plenty of them and, by my 
> admittedly partial assessment, the mood of the delegates 
> seemed finely balanced between rejection and approval. Then 
> one speaker swung the conference squarely behind the motion 
> again. In the "offices held" section of his speaker's card 
> Charles Kennedy had written "Leader of Party". It was, said 
> the session chairman proudly, striking evidence of the 
> egalitarian nature of the Liberal Democrats. It would have 
> been more striking still if Mr Kennedy hadn't been called, 
> or if he'd been rebuked for over-running his allotted five 
> minutes - but then there are limits to democracy. Earlier 
> Dr Evan Harris had warned the delegates: "Do not fall into 
> the trap of being led by tabloid scaremongering". Mr 
> Kennedy, by contrast, thought the populist bandwagon looked 
> a perfectly sensible way to travel: "The consumer and 
> citizen is king" he reminded delegates, and, what's more, 
> "we've got to be bolder in our commitment to the 
> environment". In this case, oddly, boldness takes the form 
> of being cautious to the point of paralysis, but that's 
> neither here nor there. Mr Kennedy's stage-managed 
> intervention was high-minded in its tone but at heart it 
> was an appeal for the party to behave politically not 
> rationally, to put public prejudice before private 
> knowledge. In a nice Freudian slip an anti-GM speaker had 
> earlier begged delegates to "vote for the emotion". After 
> Mr Kennedy's canny bit of rabble-rousing, they did so 
> overwhelmingly. LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: September 23, 
> 1999 [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> THE JOURNAL (Newcastle, UK) September 23, 1999, Thursday 
> Edition 1 SECTION: NATIONAL NEWS, Pg. 18 LENGTH: 574 words 
> HEADLINE: Blunt message for delegates - Move to outflank 
> Blair would be suicide BYLINE: by Paul Linford, Political 
> Editor BODY: CHARLES Kennedy will today deliver a blunt 
> message to Liberal Democrats that the party risks 
> "electoral suicide" if it swings to the left. Many 
> activists in the North of England want to see the party 
> outflank Labour on the left to try to win over voters 
> disillusioned with Tony Blair. 
> 
> But in his first keynote address as leader today, Mr 
> Kennedy will make it clear he sees no future in becoming a 
> "left of Labour" party. "That's been tried before and it 
> led to the longest suicide note in history. That would be 
> the political cul-de-sac of all time," he will say. His 
> comments echo those of Paddy Ashdown earlier this week who 
> warned that the party risked making itself "irrelevant for 
> a generation" if it swung to the left. However they 
> highlight the political difficulty facing the party at the 
> next election as it attempts to hold on to the former Tory 
> seats it won in 1997. Mr Kennedy will again reiterate his 
> commitment to social justice - but will deny that 
> necessarily means increasing public spending. " 'Can we 
> spend better?' should be the question we ask before we ask 
> whether we need to spend more," he will tell delegates. He 
> will also risk the wrath of activists by calling for an 
> extension in Lib-Lab co-operation from constitutional 
> issues to include pensions policy. He will argue that the 
> issue of caring for the elderly ought to be above party 
> politics. The comments, which again echo the views of Mr 
> Ashdown, will be seen as a further rebuke to left-wing 
> leadership contender Simon Hughes, who wants the party to 
> carve out a much more distinctively anti-Labour stance. 
> 
> Bermondsey MP Mr Hughes had made it clear he wanted the 
> deputy leadership -but his ambitions were foiled by Mr 
> Kennedy's decision to ask Berwick MP Alan Beith to stay on 
> in the job. Mr Hughes weakened his position still further 
> in a BBC interview in which he said Mr Kennedy had "never 
> been a great policy promoter" or an "ardent position taker". 
> Mr Kennedy said: "To say I am not a great policy position 
> taker is ironic when the press are saying I am too firm on 
> Europe and social justice." Meanwhile Treasury spokesman 
> Malcolm Bruce was yesterday confirmed in the newly-created 
> post of party chairman. Kennedy backs call for ban on 
> commercial growing of GM foods LIBERAL Democrats stepped up 
> the pressure on Labour yesterday to ban the commercial 
> growing of GM crops by calling for a five- year moratorium. 
> New leader Charles Kennedy, the party' s former agriculture 
> spokesman, backed the call for a ban. He attacked the 
> Government's "disastrous" handling of the issue and 
> declared: "Science should be the servant of humanity. 
> 
> Science must never become the master of humanity." 
> But a hardline call from a Northern party activist for a 
> permanent ban on GM crops was defeated. Berwick delegate 
> Fiona Hall said an immediate ban should be introduced if 
> scientific evidence showed genetic modification of crops 
> would render organic farming impossible. The policy adopted 
> by the party will allow experimentation with GM crops to 
> continue, despite the five-year ban on commercial growing. 
> 
> Young people in the North- East are positive about Europe - 
> but not about politicians. According to a poll carried out 
> by Liberal Democrats during the summer 41pc of 
> 17-18-year-olds said they were unlikely to vote in the next 
> election - but 75pc said they wanted Britain to play a 
> positive role in Europe. LOAD-DATE: September 23, 1999 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> The Scotsman September 23, 1999, Thursday SECTION: Pg. 32 
> HEADLINE: GENETIC CROPS 'TO PREVAIL' BYLINE: Fordyce Maxwell 
> BODY: SOUND science and pragmatism will get genetically 
> modified crops accepted in the UK, a leading 
> biotechnologist said yesterday. Dr Paul Rylott, a scientist 
> with AgrEvo, one of the major biotechnology companies, made 
> his comments after delivering a paper to a conference in 
> Edinburgh, organised by the Scottish Agricultural College, 
> on genetically modified crops and the environment. He said: 
> "I hope the Government will be quite robust with protesters 
> who try to destroy field trials because I believe that 
> eventually field trial evaluation will allow everyone to 
> see the benefits of GM crops." 
> 
> Many people distrusted multinational companies and anything 
> they tried to do, and probably always would, he said. 
> 
> Earlier, 70 delegates had been told by another speaker that 
> more than 80 per cent of GM patents were held by only 13 
> companies worldwide. Dr Rylott said: "I think that in 
> general sound science will prevail. Pragmatism will 
> prevail. In a few years time I am convinced that three 
> technologies will be working well side by side - 
> conventional farming, GM crop growing and organic farming." 
> 
> He could not understand why organic growers had joined the 
> protest lobby against GM crops. It must make sense, he 
> said, to have crops with in-bred resistance to diseases 
> such as potato blight, which could wipe out an organic crop 
> where chemical control could not be used. A similar claim 
> for the potential benefits of GM was made by Steve Hughes, 
> a member of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics. He told the 
> conference: " The need for campaigning groups to promote 
> their agendas by vilification of GM technology, and those 
> who practice it, has been particularly disheartening for 
> those concerned about rural poverty in parts of the world." 
> 
> Neither speaker convinced Sue Mayer, director of GeneWatch 
> UK, who said that enormous public opposition to GM crops in 
> Britain was a natural reaction. She said: "This is a 
> technology where the potential for irreversible 
> environmental effects, or on human health, is accepted. 
> 
> There is considerable scientific uncertainty. It is 
> dominated by institutions remote from most people and 
> denies them choice." 
> 
> Field trials were a source of great concern, not least 
> because they compared GM crops against crops grown under an 
> intensive system of agriculture which was itself causing 
> great concern to many people. Today the conference will 
> hear Patrick Holden of the Soil Association and a strong 
> opponent of GM technology. LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: 
> September 23, 1999 [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> The Times (London) September 23, 1999, Thursday SECTION: 
> Business LENGTH: 175 words HEADLINE: A-maize-ing BYLINE: 
> Martin Waller BODY: There is a rumour going around the food 
> industry that one of the staples of the nation's breakfast 
> tables is not untainted with genetically modified product. 
> 
> Now, whatever your view of the debate, a large "GM-free" 
> label on the package has become the marketing man's Holy 
> Grail, and its absence speaks volumes. So Kellogg's, the US 
> corporation that is the centre of such rumours, is 
> understandably a bit touchy on the subject, especially as 
> its product contains no such guarantee. I ring for 
> clarification. All of Kellogg's cereals in the UK are 
> indeed GM-free, a mouthpiece insists. Fair enough. But 
> press a bit further, and Kellogg's admits that its ghastly 
> Pop Tarts and other snacks use maize and soya, which are 
> purchased on the world market, although it insists any GM 
> material is removed during processing. Don't ask me how. 
> 
> "In addition, we are currently seeking non-GM sources for 
> these ingredients," a statement reads. Which is where the 
> rumours are coming from. The Corn Flakes are OK, but the Pop 
> Tarts will get you. LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: September 
> 23, 1999 [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> The Times (London) September 23, 1999, Thursday SECTION: 
> Home news LENGTH: 618 words HEADLINE: Spendthrift image is 
> fatal, says Kennedy BYLINE: Roland Watson, chief political 
> correspondent BODY: Charles Kennedy will warn the Liberal 
> Democrats today to shed their image as reckless spenders or 
> risk the permanent distrust of many voters. Insisting that 
> there is no future for the third party to the left of 
> Labour, Mr Kennedy will use his first conference address as 
> leader to instil in his troops a more disciplined approach 
> to policymaking. He will tell delegates in Harrogate that 
> the party's credibility is at stake and that they must 
> explore ways of spending taxpayers' money more effectively 
> before pledging to spend more of it. The message risks 
> jarring with an audience that has traditionally viewed 
> higher public spending as critical to delivering 
> improvements to health and education and helping the 
> disadvantaged. Mr Kennedy's message echoes the call from 
> his predecessor, Paddy Ashdown, for a harder-headed 
> approach to the public services. It is also designed to 
> meet Labour and Conservative charges that the party's sums 
> do not add up. Only yesterday the Prime Minister said that 
> the Liberal Democrats had to be responsible about public 
> spending if they wanted to help to shape politics into the 
> next century. Mr Kennedy will emphasise that the party has 
> to go beyond promising to spend money. He will say: "Make 
> no mistake, our response is not solely about spending. Our 
> future is not as a left-of-Labour party. That has been 
> tried. It led to the longest suicide note in history. That 
> would be the political cul-de-sac of all time." 
> 
> His address comes against the backdrop of deep irritation 
> with Simon Hughes, after the defeated leadership challenger 
> questioned Mr Kennedy's abilities to do the job. Party 
> officials publicly dismissed as "Simon being Simon" his 
> suggestion that Mr Kennedy still had to answer questions 
> about his credentials. But there was anger among Liberal 
> Democrat MPs at Mr Hughes's intervention, which included a 
> warning that the party would probably lose about six of its 
> 46 seats at the next election. Adrian Sanders, who took 
> Torbay with a majority of 12 in 1997, accused Mr Hughes of 
> failing to "engage his brain before opening his mouth". Mr 
> Sanders told BBC Radio 4's World at One: "Some people speak 
> from the hip. Simon is one of those people. That's maybe 
> one reason why he didn't become leader." A senior party 
> source said there were about 18 MPs who felt vulnerable 
> enough about their prospects to believe Mr Hughes had been 
> referring to their seats. "This has not done Simon any good 
> at all," they said. Another suggested that the critical 
> reaction to the comments may make it easier for Mr Kennedy 
> to extract promises of good behaviour from Mr Hughes when he 
> reshuffles his frontbench team as MPs return to Westminster 
> next month. Mr Hughes had been hoping to capitalise on his 
> close second place in the race for Mr Ashdown's crown to 
> succeed Alan Beith as deputy leader. But Mr Beith has made 
> clear this week that he intends to stand again for the post 
> when his term is up in November. Mr Kennedy used 
> yesterday's debate on genetically modified food, in which 
> the party agreed its stance of a five-year moratorium on 
> commercial growing, to emphasise a theme of his leadership. 
> He urged the party to be bolder in its approach to the 
> environment because it was going to be an increasingly 
> critical issue electorally. Mr Kennedy said that with more 
> and more young people learning about the environment at 
> school, the electorate of tomorrow would demand a greater 
> emphasis on environmental issues. "We have got to be in 
> that slipstream," he said. Roger Scruton, page 22 Leading 
> article, page 23 LINKS www.the-times.co.uk/libdems 
> Continually updated coverage of the Liberal Democrat 
> conference LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: September 23, 1999 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> <<GP>> 
> Chemical News & Intelligence September 21, 1999 LENGTH: 
> 1077 words HEADLINE: In Tuesday's US papers SOURCE: 
> Chemical News & Intelligence BYLINE: Mary Ann Tawasha BODY: 
> International Economics & Politics GM foods discussions to 
> resume in January The UN-sponsored global talks on 
> regulating the multibillion-dollar trade in genetically 
> modified (GM) foods and crops have ended in Vienna without 
> resolution, but both industry and environmentalists said 
> progress has been made. Negotiating parties agreed that 
> another round of talks would take place in Montreal in 
> January because it was necessary to iron out differences 
> before the Biosafety Protocol could be signed by ministers 
> in May 2000. According to Greenpeace, the major development 
> from the five-day talks was the firm resolve of the 
> so-called "Like-Minded Group" of the developing world to 
> insist on their right to reject imports of GM commodities. 
> 
> The Journal of Commerce, page 19 Clinton Medicare drug 
> plan attacked again Citizens for Better Medicare, a group 
> led by the drug industry, claims President Clinton's 
> proposal to add prescription-drug coverage to the 
> government's Medicare programme could encourage employers 
> to drop from their pharmacy- benefit plans as many as nine 
> million senior citizens. A study commissioned by the group 
> concluded that the Clinton plan would give employers an 
> excuse to shift their retirees into the government 
> programme. The Wall Street Journal, page A4 Labour holding 
> back on backing Gore AFL-CIO President John Sweeney wants 
> to endorse Vice President Al Gore for President, but two 
> things are holding Sweeney and other labour leaders back. 
> 
> First, they are reluctant to force an endorsement down the 
> throats of federation members bitterly angry over the 
> administration's free trade policies. Second, they want to 
> be sure that an endorsement is not interpreted as labour's 
> attempt to throw a lifeline to a drowning candidate. Most 
> but not all opposition to Gore is concentrated in 
> industrial and manufacturing unions that have experienced 
> sharp membership declines as production has moved abroad 
> and domestic products have faced rigorous foreign 
> competition. The Washington Post, page A6 Oil & Gas Battle 
> looms in Senate over federal royalties Oil companies 
> drilling on federal land have been accused of habitually 
> underpaying royalties they owe the government. Challenged 
> in court, they have settled lawsuits, agreeing to pay 
> Dollars 5bn (Euro4.8bn). The Interior Department wants to 
> rectify the situation by making the companies pay royalties 
> based on the market price of the oil, instead of on a lower 
> price set by the oil companies themselves. The issue could 
> come to a vote in the Senate this week, and it appears as 
> if the Senate might side with the oil companies. The New 
> York Times, page A18 TotalFina's buy of Elf may be only a 
> prelude French-Belgian TotalFina's acquisition of Elf 
> Aquitaine will bring the end of what was until recently 
> France's state-owned oil company. It will also elevate 
> Thierry Desmarest, the combative chairman of TotalFina, to 
> the top ranks of the world oil industry. The new company, 
> which has yet to be named, will be the world's 
> fourth-largest petrochemical company and will have revenue 
> of about Dollars 70bn. But the deal also highlights the 
> fissures that still divide European oil producers. European 
> oil companies remain riven by issues of national pride and 
> their heritage as former state-owned enterprises. The New 
> York Times, page C1 Chevron, Phillips talks rumoured 
> Chevron and Phillips Petroleum have discussed forming a 
> joint venture in the petrochemical business, people close 
> to both companies said Monday. The Sunday Times of London 
> reported over the weekend that Chevron was in talks to buy 
> Phillips in a deal that would be worth about Dollars 
> 16.5bn. The companies said they had no comment on the 
> report of merger talks. But analysts and other experts said 
> Monday that oil companies like Chevron and Phillips that 
> did not find partners in the recent wave of industry 
> mergers are under less pressure to snare a mate now that 
> crude oil prices have recovered. The New York Times, page C2 
> Company News & Results Schering to acquire Diatide German 
> drug maker Schering said Monday that it would buy the 
> biotechnology company Diatide for about Dollars 100m, to 
> enter the radiopharmaceuticals business. Diatide, based in 
> Londonderry, New Hampshire, specialises in peptide 
> engineering, molecular biology and radio-labelling 
> chemistry. The New York Times, page C4 The Wall Street 
> Journal, page B8 Novartis hopes new drugs help sales 
> Novartis is scheduled to unveil results of clinical trials 
> for several drugs Tuesday that will be important for the 
> company's future profits. Results of trials for potential 
> blockbuster treatments for irritable bowel syndrome, adult 
> onset diabetes, allergies, and macular degeneration will be 
> unveiled. Analysts said the results could be a decisive 
> turning point for the company. The Wall Street Journal, 
> page B4 Transportation Court says FTZs are not exempt The 
> Court of International Trade ruled last week that goods 
> entering foreign trade zones (FTZs) and subzones are not 
> exempt from the harbour maintenance tax (HMT). The decision 
> applies to the more than 3500 US companies that use FTZs 
> and subzones. FTZs are sites in the US, usually near a 
> customs port of entry, where merchandise is stored or 
> processed without being cleared into US commerce. Sir Leon 
> Brittan, vice president of the European Union's European 
> Commission, has warned the US administration in a letter 
> that if the US continues collecting the HMT on imports 
> after 1 January, the commission will seek redress in the 
> World Trade Organisation. The Journal of Commerce, page 1 
> Mexican acid boosts business Union Pacific Railroad expects 
> to move large volumes of Mexican-made sulphuric acid to US 
> markets now that a border-area short line has been acquired 
> by its Mexican railroad partner, Grupo Mexico. Grupo Mexico 
> is the 74% majority partner of Ferrocarril Mexicano 
> (Ferromex), with UP holding the remainder. The short line 
> was acquired independently of the joint venture, but it 
> will be operated by Ferromex. Both UP and its Mexican 
> partner expect to benefit from a recent boom in demand for 
> sulphuric acid in the US market. The Journal of Commerce, 
> page 4 (Some of the above stories may not appear in all 
> editions of the relevant newspapers.) 
> 
> LANGUAGE: English LOAD-DATE: September 23, 1999 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> <<GP>> 
> Chemical News & Intelligence September 21, 1999 HEADLINE: 
> Monsanto Brazil halts GM soy seed for now SOURCE: Chemical 
> News & Intelligence BYLINE: Alastair Stewart DATELINE: SAO 
> PAULO BODY: Monsanto Brazil (MTC) has given up hope of 
> selling its genetically-modified (GM) Round Up Ready 
> soybeans here for the 1999-2000 harvest, CNI learned 
> Tuesday. The company said its decision to abandon marketing 
> of the Round Up Ready soybeans for this year was forced by 
> the Brazilian injunction which has suspended planting and 
> commercial distribution of GM soybeans pending an 
> environmental impact study. "The injunction has fatally 
> delayed our research and cultivation," said Mario Sergio 
> Carvalho, commercial manager at Monsoy, a Brazilian 
> subsidiary of the St Louis, Missouri-based life sciences 
> company. "The delay affects all production as the 
> agricultural calendar does not stop. Producers are running 
> out of time to plant this harvest," said Carvalho. Next 
> year's crop also is at risk, the Monsoy manager said. "If 
> the injunction on the commercial sale of Round Up Ready is 
> not lifted by mid-October, it will be difficult to produce 
> the necessary seeds for the 2000-2001 harvest," he noted. 
> 
> "They could be planted under cover or in the winter, but 
> this would mean much higher production costs," explained 
> Carvalho. Meanwhile, Monsanto on Monday officially lodged 
> an appeal against the ban. The Brazilian Institute of 
> Consumers' Defence (IDEC) and the international 
> environmental group, Greenpeace - the two parties who won 
> the court injunction - will have until the end of the month 
> to counter Monsanto's appeal before it is analysed by a 
> group of federal judges. The appeal process may take as 
> long as three months. LANGUAGE: English LOAD-DATE: 
> September 23, 1999 [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> <<GP>> 
> Bristol Evening Post September 20, 1999 EDITION: BRISTOL 
> SOUTH SECTION: News, Pg.4 
> 
> LENGTH: 28 words HEADLINE: GM crop trial BODY: NORFOLK: 
> Lord Melchett, executive director of Greenpeace, and 27 
> other protesters were committed to crown court for trial on 
> charges of damaging a GM crop. LANGUAGE: English LOAD-DATE: 
> September 23, 1999 [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> <<GP>> 
> The Toronto Star September 20, 1999, Monday, Edition 1 
> SECTION: BUSINESS LENGTH: 299 words HEADLINE: MODIFIED FOOD 
> TALKS FAIL AGAIN BYLINE: Stuart Laidlaw BODY: United 
> Nations talks on trade in genetically modified foods ended 
> in failure last night for the second time in seven months 
> after a Canada-led group objected to allowing countries to 
> unilaterally refuse such food. ''They're still holding the 
> world hostage,'' Louise Gale, head of a Greenpeace group 
> monitoring the talks, said in an interview from Vienna. The 
> failure of the talks sets the stage for a confrontation 
> over the same issue when World Trade Organization talks 
> begin in two months. The deal fell apart last night in 
> Vienna, where the same group of grain-exporting nations 
> that scuttled a deal last February again refused to allow 
> countries to ban genetically modified foods where there's 
> no scientific basis for caution. The talks were organized 
> after the February failure so countries could iron out their 
> differences and draft a deal to be ratified early next year. 
> Instead, the 130 countries seemed to become more entrenche, 
> and made little progress toward a deal, Gale said. ''They 
> haven't drafted any text,'' she said, adding delegates 
> spent most of the weekend discussing general principals. 
> 
> Canada, the United States, Australia, Argentina, Chile and 
> Uruguay are expected to push the World Trade Organization 
> talks toward making science the only basis for restrictions 
> in trade of genetically altered foods. That could put these 
> countries on a collision course with the European Union, 
> which has placed a moratorium on genetically altered foods, 
> citing consumer worries. The weekend meeting ended with the 
> countries agreeing to send their environment ministers to a 
> meeting in Montreal in January to work out a deal. 
> 
> Meanwhile, Greenpeace says federal plans to begin 
> voluntary labelling of genetically altered foods do not go 
> far enough. LANGUAGE: English LOAD-DATE: September 22, 1999 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> REUTERS NEWS SERVICE , More specialty U.S. soybeans on the 
> way - USB SINGAPORE: September 23, 1999 SINGAPORE - A 
> myriad of new soybean varieties is being developed by the 
> U.S. seed industry to meet specific needs of customers, 
> Criss Davis, farmer-director of the U.S. United Soybean 
> Board (USB) said yesterday. 
> 
> "We expect several of these identity-preserved soybean 
> varieties to be on the market in the United States within 
> the next five years," he told a conference for southeast 
> Asian soy buyers in Singapore. The U.S. seed industry is 
> also seeking improvements in so-called "generic soybeans", 
> the category that makes up the vast number of beans grown 
> in the United States. "The new identity-preserved soybean 
> varieties, as well as the new generic Better Bean, will be 
> developed...through conventional breeding as well as 
> biotechnology," Davis told the meeting organised by the 
> American Soybean Association (ASA). Davis listed some 
> examples of new, identity-preserved varieties: - Beans 
> improved through biotechnology that contain more phosphorus 
> that can be digested by poultry and swine. This would 
> enhance output and reduce environmental pollution. - Beans 
> that contain higher levels of key amino acids. - 
> Genetically-improved beans with lower levels of two complex 
> carbohydrates that poultry and swine find indigestible. 
> 
> Other new biotechnology varieties may increase beneficial 
> bacteria in the intestines of animals. "Biotechnology is a 
> tool that will allow us and you to provide our citizens 
> with more and better food," Davis said. "We have perhaps 
> the strictest regulatory approval process of any country in 
> the world." 
> 
> Some 55 percent of the U.S. soybean crop and a substantial 
> part of the Argentine crop this year are already grown from 
> seeds that are genetically-modified to tolerate the 
> environmentally-friendly herbicide glyphosate. Consumer 
> opposition to products with GM content has grown strongly 
> this year in Europe, a leading market for U.S. products. 
> 
> The United Soybean Board is made up of farmers 
> representing all the U.S. growing regions. It invests 
> farmer money in marketing, promotion and research 
> programmes. 
> 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> REUTERS NEWS SERVICE , FOCUS - Brake Bros sees GM-free 
> boost UK: September 23, 1999 LONDON - British frozen food 
> supplier Brake Bros Plc said yesterday it hoped the 
> elimination of genetically modified ingredients from its 
> products would boost business following a robust first half 
> performance. 
> 
> "We now feel we are ahead of the game and there is a real 
> opportunity that we will gain business as a result of 
> this," Chief Executive Ian Player told Reuters. "We believe 
> we are the first ones to say we are totally GM free of 
> ingredients in our sector," he said. Brake Bros, which 
> supplies a range of over 2,000 frozen products to the 
> catering industry, unveiled pre-tax profits of 16.8 million 
> pounds for the six months to June 30, from 13.7 million 
> previously, on turnover up 35.6 percent to 465.6 million 
> pounds. The results beat analysts' profits forecasts of 
> 15.3 to 15.7 million pounds. Brake Bros began removing GM 
> ingredients from its products a year ago as it became aware 
> of consumer concern about the issue. "We just had a feeling 
> the issue would grow and grow which it has done and if we 
> had not taken (the ingredients) out we would potentially 
> have been losing business," said Player. The recent 
> completion of this elimination process coincides with 
> government regulations, which came into force this week, 
> requiring that all UK catering premises, from restaurants 
> to pubs and canteens, should identify GM ingredients in 
> their dishes. The company, whose foodservices division also 
> includes Country Choice, Larderfresh, Puritan Maid and the 
> recently acquired Watson & Philip, currently has around 28 
> percent of the frozen food catering market, up from 26 
> percent two years ago. Player said he was confident its 
> market share would be pushed up to over 30 percent in the 
> next couple of years. The company said it continued to look 
> for acquisition opportunities in Britain and hoped to 
> expand elsewhere in Europe following investment in France, 
> where sales increased five percent in the first half. Brake 
> Bros shares were unchanged at 642-1/2p by 0835 GMT. 
> 
> Story by Philippa Moreton [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> REUTERS NEWS SERVICE , Dupont sets environmental, biotech 
> goals USA: September 23, 1999 BOSTON - Seeking to reduce 
> the chemical giant's impact on the global environment, 
> DuPont Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Charles Holliday 
> said the company expects to derive 25 percent of its 
> revenues in 2010 from non-depletable raw materials. 
> 
> Holliday, speaking at Boston College's Chief Executives 
> Club, said that in 1998 less than 5 percent of his 
> company's sales came from materials other than depletable 
> raw materials, such as oil or water. DuPont, the world's 
> largest chemical company, recently set a goal of sourcing 
> 10 percent of its energy needs from renewable sources such 
> as solar power by the end of 2010, versus almost none right 
> now. "We have never made a public long-term goal we didn't 
> meet," Holliday told reporters following his speech. 
> 
> Responding to consumer concerns over genetically modified 
> food products, especially in Europe, Holliday said DuPont 
> would, by the beginning of 2000, launch a "global 
> biotechnology panel" to solicit the opinions of experts, 
> including critics, on the use of bioengineering. Food 
> labeling is a sticky issue, Holliday acknowledged. "We know 
> the labeling subject is important, and there should be 
> dialogue around that subject," he said. "The idea of 
> labeling the process by which something was made is a new 
> area." 
> 
> Asked if he believed biotechnology was safe, Holliday 
> answered, "I believe this technology can be practiced 
> safely. I'm not sure if there's anything in the world that 
> is totally risk-free. The issue is can you practice the 
> technology safely, and what's the benefit of the 
> technology?" [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> <<GP>> 
> WORLD TRADE: Biotech chief acknowledges depth of consumer 
> fears NEWS DIGEST: Financial Times ; 23-Sep-1999 The head 
> of one of the world's biggest life sciences companies 
> yesterday acknowledged that the biotechnology industry was 
> widely perceived as arrogant and needed to be more 
> sensitive to consumer fears over genetically-modified foods. 
> In a conciliatory speech reflecting the growing impact the 
> environmental campaign against GM foods is having on the 
> industry, Chad Holliday, chief executive of DuPont, said 
> there was rising concern about genetic enhancement. 
> 
> "This public concern has been aggravated by the perception 
> that we in industry have often acted as though public fears 
> are not legitimate and are the result of ignorance." 
> Biotech companies, he said, must do a better job of 
> "engaging, listening to and addressing the concerns of all 
> stakeholders in this global debate." 
> 
> The chief executive's acknowledgment of past errors in 
> the sector reflects growing industry concern about the 
> effectiveness of the public relations campaign being waged 
> internationally against GM crops. 
> 
> Opponents of genetically modified crops have become ever 
> more vociferous in recent months. Earlier this year, 
> scientists in the US fanned the controversy by announcing a 
> popular GM maize crop was toxic to monarch butterflies. In 
> July, Greenpeace activists destroyed crops of genetically 
> modified maize in the UK. Victoria Griffith, Boston 
> Copyright © The Financial Times Limited [Entered 
> September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> Liberation, Online, L'Europe, engrais de la résistance Les 
> Etats-Unis ouvrent le dialogue. Tandis que la France se 
> divise. Par CATHERINE COROLLER Le mardi 21 septembre 1999 
> Les Etats-Unis et les entreprises productrices de plantes 
> transgéniques peuvent se faire du souci. Chaque jour, 
> l'opposition aux OGM grandit. Hier, les délégations de 135 
> pays réunis à l'ONU, à Vienne, pour des consultations 
> internationales sur les exportations de plantes 
> génétiquement modifiées des pays producteurs (Etats-Unis, 
> Argentine, Australie, Canada, Chili et Uruguay), ont 
> affirmé leur détermination à adopter un «protocole» qui 
> réglemente ce commerce, en raison des dangers potentiels 
> pour l'environnement. Les négociations sur l'adoption de ce 
> protocole, additionnel à la Convention sur la bio-diversité 
> signée en 1992 à Rio, avaient échoué en février à 
> Carthagène (Colombie). Elles doivent reprendre du 20 au 28 
> janvier à Montréal avec les ministres de l'Environnement. 
> 
> 75 pays du tiers monde ont insisté sur le droit de refuser 
> ces importations. Au Brésil, l'Etat du Rio Grande do Sul 
> interdit ainsi toute culture de plantes transgéniques. Au 
> printemps, ses dirigeants sont venus en France rencontrer 
> des responsables de coopératives agricoles. Objectif: 
> tenter de trouver des débouchés pour leurs exportations 
> garanties sans OGM. Signes de défiance. Au sujet des 
> importations de produits alimentaires transformés, des pays 
> comme le Japon, la Corée du Sud, l'Australie et la 
> Nouvelle-Zélande ont décidé d'étiqueter ceux contenant des 
> OGM. Une mesure paradoxale, puisque les risques pour la 
> santé humaine ont été déclarés mineurs ou quasi nuls par 
> les experts (lire pages 3 et 4). Les consommateurs risquent 
> tout de même de le recevoir comme un signe de défiance 
> envers ces aliments, donc un appel à ne pas les consommer. 
> 
> D'autres nations comme la Chine, la Thaïlande et la 
> Malaisie semblent moins préoccupés par le dossier des OGM, 
> même s'ils n'excluent pas officiellement des mesures 
> d'étiquetage. Enfin, aux Etats-Unis, des îlots de 
> résistance apparaissent. En cause, les pratiques des 
> semenciers accusés de faire main basse sur les marchés 
> agricoles (lire page 2). Dans son édition du 13 septembre, 
> le Financial Times annonçait que des actions antitrust 
> seront intentées d'ici à la fin de l'année contre les 
> principaux semenciers par la Foundation on Economic Trends 
> (dirigée par Jeremy Rifking), par la National Family Farm 
> Coalition et, à titre individuel, par des agriculteurs 
> d'Europe, d'Asie, d'Amérique latine et du Nord. Fer de 
> lance de la résistance aux OGM: l'Europe. Vendredi, le 
> sous-secrétaire d'Etat américain au Commerce, David Aaron, 
> a déclaré que les Etats-Unis sont favorables à un débat 
> avec les scientifiques, les hommes politiques et l'opinion 
> publique de l'Union européenne. «Il existe des accords 
> commerciaux, et la question pourrait être commerciale. 
> 
> Toutefois, mon opinion et celle du secrétaire au Commerce, 
> William Daley, est qu'il est justifié d'entamer le dialogue 
> avec l'Europe, car là-bas la question est perçue comme un 
> problème d'hygiène alimentaire, a déclaré D. Aaron. Nous 
> comprenons les craintes [des Européens] et devons y 
> répondre.» 
> 
> Le cas français. Un dialogue urgent, car, en France 
> notamment, la débâcle se poursuit. Chaque jour, de nouveaux 
> industriels et distributeurs clament leur décision de ne 
> plus proposer de produits contenant des OGM. La Fédération 
> nationale des producteurs de légumes (FNPL) vient d'écrire 
> au ministre de l'Agriculture Jean Glavany pour qu'il pèse 
> de «tout son poids pour un moratoire sur l'utilisation 
> d'OGM». La FNPL estime qu'il est «bien trop tôt pour mettre 
> des OGM dans les légumes, car le consommateur n'est pas 
> prêt à cette mutation et ne la demande pas». Jeudi, les 
> Centre Leclerc ont annoncé désormais commercialiser 
> dix-huit produits garantis sans OGM, sous leur label 
> «marque repère». L'enseigne explique vouloir «se faire le 
> relais des craintes des consommateurs». La veille, le 
> fabricant d'aliments pour animaux, Royal Canin, avait 
> décidé de n'incorporer aucun OGM dans ses produits. Cet 
> abandon est confirmé par une enquête de la Direction 
> générale de la concurrence, de la consommation et de la 
> répression des fraudes, dont les résultats ont été publiés 
> le 14 septembre. Durant le quatrième trimestre 1998 et le 
> premier trimestre 1999, cette administration a contrôlé 94 
> entreprises pour savoir si elles respectaient l'obligation 
> d'étiquetage qui s'impose à tout produit alimentaire 
> contenant des OGM. Résultat: 13 indiquaient la présence de 
> dérivés de maïs ou de soja génétiquement modifiés, une 
> entreprise indiquait que son produit n'en contenait pas, et 
> 80 n'indiquaient rien. Sur ces 80, 40 disposaient 
> d'attestation sur l'honneur de fournisseurs jurant ne pas 
> utiliser d'OGM et, ce qui est révélateur de la tendance 
> actuelle, 43 avaient modifié les recettes de leurs 
> produits, afin d'éliminer les dérivés du maïs et du soja 
> pour les remplacer par des produits issus d'autres espèces 
> végétales (blé, pomme de terre, riz, pois, fèves, manioc, 
> betterave...). Le précédent Juppé. Les OGM ne font donc 
> plus recette. Y compris sur le front politique. Dans le 
> discours qu'il a prononcé le 16 septembre pour 
> l'inauguration de Terre attitude (manifestation organisée 
> par le Centre national des jeunes agriculteurs à Pomacle, 
> Marne), Jacques Chirac a rappelé qu'à propos des OGM, deux 
> principes s'opposent: «Pour les uns, une production doit 
> être autorisée et sa commercialisation ne peut être 
> entravée dès lors qu'il n'a pas été démontré qu'elle 
> pouvait être dangereuse. C'est la position, notamment, de 
> nos amis américains. Pour les autres, au contraire, la mise 
> en oeuvre d'une technique ou la diffusion d'un produit ne 
> peuvent intervenir que s'il est prouvé qu'ils ne présentent 
> pas d'inconvénient pour la santé et pour l'équilibre 
> écologique. C'est le principe de précaution que défend la 
> France.» 
> 
> Une prise de position tardive, puisque c'est son Premier 
> ministre, Alain Juppé, qui, le premier, a ouvert la porte 
> aux OGM, en autorisant les importations de soja et de maïs 
> génétiquement modifiés. Glavany cohérent. De ce point de 
> vue, la position du ministre de l'Agriculture, Jean 
> Glavany, dont le gouvernement a autorisé la mise en culture 
> d'un maïs transgénique, est plus cohérente. Interviewé le 
> 15 septembre à Toulouse en marge du 50e congrès de 
> l'Association générale des producteurs de maïs (AGPM), Jean 
> Glavany a déclaré qu'il «ne faut pas avoir un jugement ni 
> tout pour ni tout contre» les OGM. «Imaginez qu'on découvre 
> un blé qui pousse sans eau dans le désert du Sahel et qu'on 
> résolve le problème de la faim dans le monde, qui pourrait 
> le refuser?», s'est interrogé le ministre. Motif de cette 
> prudence? Les OGM sont déjà largement présents dans 
> l'assiette des consommateurs. Chaque année, l'Union 
> européenne importe des millions de tonnes de matières 
> premières transgéniques, dont le soja qui fournit la 
> lécithine utilisée dans la fabrication du chocolat et de 
> nombreux autres aliments industriels. Mais les additifs 
> n'étant pas concernés par l'obligation d'étiquetage, les 
> consommateurs n'en sauront jamais rien. 
> 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> Liberation, Online, L'agrochimie prépare la révolution du 
> troisième millénaire Une planète génétiquement modifiée 
> sort de terre En dépit des résistances européennes et 
> nationales aux OGM, des firmes investissent dans des 
> recherches tous azimuts. Par VITTORIO DE FILIPPIS Le mardi 
> 21 septembre 1999, e meilleur des mondes sera transgénique. 
> Malgré un débat agité autour des plantes génétiquement 
> modifiées, ces fameux OGM ou «Frankenstein Food», les plus 
> grandes multinationales de l'agrochimie conservent tous 
> leurs espoirs au fond des éprouvettes. Elles sont une 
> poignée (dix) pour qui la révolution du troisième 
> millénaire est déjà en marche: Monsanto (lire page 4), 
> Novartis, AgrAvo, DuPont, Rhône Poulenc, BASF ou encore 
> Astra-Zenecca, Bayer, Dow Agrosciences, American Home 
> Products. Toutes américaines ou européennes. Depuis plus de 
> vingt ans, ces conquistadores des cultures transgéniques 
> parient, à coups de milliards de dollars, sur l'irruption 
> massive des produits génétiquement modifiés. Jackpot. 
> 
> Jusqu'ici, ces multinationales de l'agrochimie, 
> spécialistes des plantes, se partageaient 80 % du marché 
> mondial des engrais et des pesticides d'un poids de 30 
> milliards de dollars par an. Elles ont rapidement pris 
> conscience que leurs recherches génétiques pouvaient offrir 
> des débouchés gigantesques. Mais pourquoi alors laisser les 
> retombées commerciales aux semenciers? «Les agrochimistes 
> ont vite compris que la valorisation des OGM passait par 
> l'intégration industrielle des semenciers», explique 
> Pierre-Benoît Joly, économiste à l'Inra (Institut national 
> de la recherche agronomique). Peu à peu, ils ont donc pris 
> le contrôle des vendeurs de semences. Et verrouillé la 
> filière. Pour les industriels de l'agrochimie, c'est le 
> jackpot: ils continuent de vendre leur herbicides, tout en 
> pénétrant le nouveau marché des semences génétiquement 
> modifiées. C'est la stratégie de «vente en kit». Ce n'est 
> pas tout. Depuis toujours, les paysans conservent une part 
> de leur récolte pour semer la saison suivante. Les firmes 
> semencières ont toujours vu d'un mauvais oeil cette 
> réutilisation. L'apparition des semences hybrides a 
> constitué un premier pas vers la mise sous tutelle des 
> agriculteurs. Si ces derniers ressèment un maïs hybride, le 
> rendement de la seconde génération est très hasardeux. Les 
> agriculteurs sont alors contraints d'acheter de la semence 
> chaque année. L'utilisation des OGM - et des brevets qui 
> leurs sont attachés - renforce cette dépendance. Face aux 
> perspectives d'une plus grande rentabilité à l'hectare que 
> font miroiter les vendeurs de semences transgéniques, les 
> agriculteurs, notamment américains, ont fini par accepter 
> de nouvelles règles du jeu; ils se sont engagés, sur la 
> base d'un contrat longue durée, à acheter les semences et 
> les produits qui vont avec. Et pas question de tricher. A 
> l'instar de Monsanto, les firmes qui adoptent cette 
> stratégie de vente ont ouvert des lignes téléphoniques à la 
> délation des «tricheurs». Les «dix» veulent maintenant 
> s'attaquer aux pays en voie de développement, où les 
> «semences fermières» (produites par les agriculteurs) 
> représentent 90 % des plantations. Un marché potentiel de 
> 15 milliards de dollars. Or vert. La bataille décisive est 
> celle des brevets. Les forêts des pays en développement, 
> très riches en ressources végétales, sont devenues l'or 
> vert de ces entreprises. Ces dernières envoient ainsi leurs 
> bioprospecteurs au Brésil, au Pérou, en Chine, en 
> Afrique... où ils s'empressent de trouver le «bon» gène, 
> dans l'espoir de modeler une plante aux couleurs du marché. 
> Depuis des années, les prospecteurs des plus grandes 
> multinationales de l'agrochimie, mais aussi des start-up 
> européennes ou américaines, prélèvent des échantillons de 
> matière végétale et répertorient les utilisations 
> traditionnelles de ces plantes. Comme si les populations 
> indigènes étaient en avance. «Dans toute autre situation, 
> ces pratiques seraient qualifiées d'espionnage industriel, 
> explique Jean-Pierre Berland, chercheur à l'Inra. Elles 
> consistent à "voler" des matériels génétiques et un savoir 
> ancestral pour élaborer de nouveaux produits génétiquement 
> modifiés. Auparavant, le matériel végétal était considéré 
> comme faisant partie intégrante de l'humanité. Mais les 
> Etats-Unis ont réussi à faire adopter une décision qui a 
> fait jurisprudence en autorisant, en 1980, l'octroi d'un 
> brevet pour un organisme génétiquement modifié. Ce qui a 
> lancé la première étape de la course au dépôts de brevets 
> sur le vivant.» Par ce biais, ces entreprises se 
> constituent actuellement des portefeuilles de nouveaux 
> produits génétiquement modifiés. Car, pour elles, tout 
> reste à jouer. Suprématie mondiale. Du président Reagan à 
> Clinton, en passant par Bush, les gouvernements américains 
> se sont laissés convaincre. En pleine bagarre économique 
> avec le Japon pour la suprématie des techniques de pointe, 
> les législateurs américains ont vu dans le génie génétique 
> un moyen de conserver leur suprématie mondiale en matière 
> agricole. «La priorité des gouvernements américains 
> concernait d'abord les bénéfices industriels, et, très loin 
> derrière, les questions de sécurité publique», explique 
> Suzanne Pons, ingénieur agronome en biotechnologies 
> végétales. «La révolution des biotechnologies est 
> comparable à celle de l'Internet. Dans un cas comme dans 
> l'autre, il s'agit d'être le premier à détenir 
> l'information», estime Daniel Rahier, de Monsanto. Il faut 
> donc devenir l'Intel de l'agriculture, être en situation de 
> domination, pour contraindre le marché à utiliser une 
> «séquence codante brevetée». Les multinationales de 
> l'agrochimie comptent rapidement proposer des OGM de la 
> seconde génération: la greffe des gènes sur des produits 
> alimentaires permet d'imaginer des fruits ou des viandes 
> génétiquement reconstruits «à la carte», en fonction des 
> desiderata de l'agroalimentaire. Un pactole évalué à plus 
> de 12 000 milliards de francs par an! «Plante-usine». 
> 
> L'imagination des «ex-agrochimistes» ne s'arrête pas là: 
> les multinationales préparent une économie mondiale 
> génétiquement modifiée. «Notre centre de recherche de San 
> Diego compte 600 personnes. Nous y effectuons des 
> recherches sur la génomique fonctionnelle. Ce programme, 
> qui s'étale sur dix ans, représente un investissement de 
> près de 600 millions de dollars», précise André Goig, 
> patron de Novartis pour l'Europe. Agriculture, santé, 
> environnement, mais aussi énergie, chimie, textile... aucun 
> secteur n'y échappe. Les agrochimistes de Monsanto ont déjà 
> réalisé une «plante-usine» capable de produire du 
> plastique. De la même façon, des gènes peuvent modifier la 
> composition du coton, qui prend la couleur d'un jean. 
> 
> D'autres «plantes-usines» permettront de fabriquer des 
> huiles spéciales. De quoi économiser l'énergie fossile. 
> 
> Mais la vraie rupture interviendra avec la 
> commercialisation des «alicaments», ces aliments à la 
> frontière des médicaments. A peine né, le marché mondial de 
> la biotech' apparaît déjà comme un business sans fin. 
> 
> [Entered September 23, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
> Neue Zuercher Zeitung September 23, 1999 SECTION: 
> WIRTSCHAFT TEXT; Seite 27 LENGTH: 1051 words HEADLINE: 
> Novartis mit begruendeten Produktehoffnungen; Langsamer 
> Abschied vom integrierten "Life-Sciences"-Konzept BYLINE: 
> Hofmann D. DATELINE: Hm. New York, 22. September BODY: An 
> einer Praesentation vor Analytikern in New York hat 
> Novartis aufgezeigt, dass die in den naechsten Jahren auf 
> den Markt kommenden Medikamente den Konzern in die Lage 
> versetzen sollen, ab 2001 wieder Marktanteile zu gewinnen. 
> 
> Gleichzeitig zeichnet sich eine staerkere Fokussierung auf 
> den Pharmabereich ab; das Agrogeschaeft wird nicht mehr als 
> integraler Bestandteil des "Life-Sciences"-Konzepts 
> verstanden. Novartis verfuegt nach eigener Einschaetzung 
> ueber intakte Chancen, um am Pharmamarkt - auf dem 46% des 
> letztjaehrigen Konzernumsatzes und 71% des Betriebsgewinns 
> erzielt wurden - die seit der Fusion zwischen Ciba und 
> Sandoz verlorenen Anteile zurueckzuerobern. Wie Konzernchef 
> Daniel Vasella im Rahmen einer ganztaegigen 
> Analytikerkonferenz zur Praesentation der Forschung und 
> Entwicklung (F&E) in New York erklaerte, sollte das 
> Pharmageschaeft im Jahr 2001 wieder mit der geschaetzten 
> Marktentwicklung und in den Jahren danach sogar ueber dem 
> Markt wachsen. Der Schluessel fuer den erwarteten Erfolg 
> liegt in den zuletzt eingefuehrten Produkten sowie in neuen 
> Medikamenten, die in absehbarer Zeit mit einer Kadenz von 
> drei neuen Einheiten pro Jahr auf den Markt kommen sollen. 
> 
> Dazu gehoeren etwa Zelmac (Reizdarm), Starlix 
> (Altersdiabetes), E 25 (Asthma und Allergien) sowie 
> Visudyne (Altersblindheit), fuer die in New York zum Teil 
> ausgesprochen gute Resultate der klinischen Ueberpruefung 
> vorgelegt wurden und fuer die der Konzern mit 
> "Blockbuster"-Umsaetzen von 1 Mrd. Fr. und mehr im fuenften 
> Jahr nach der Markteinfuehrung rechnet. Die Entwicklung im 
> Griff Kurzfristig gilt es nach Pharmachef "Jerry" Karabelas 
> allerdings, die momentanen Schwaechen der Produktegamme mit 
> einer akzentuierten Staerkung von gegenwaertigen Rennern wie 
> Diovan (Bluthochdruck) sowie von breit vermarkteten 
> Erzeugnissen (wie Lamisil oder Lescol) auszubuegeln. 
> 
> Gleichzeitig will er noch mehr Verkaufstruppen an die 
> amerikanische Front werfen. Allein in diesem Jahr sollen 
> 350 und im Jahr 2000 nochmals 700 zusaetzliche 
> Aerztebesucher eingestellt werden, womit das Total in den 
> USA auf 3780 zu stehen kommen wird. Der Erfolg in Amerika 
> duerfte ueberproportional zum Konzernerfolg beitragen, gilt 
> doch der US-Markt als enorm dynamisch und wegen der 
> gemessen an Europa weitgehenden Absenz von Preiskontrollen 
> als besonders profitabel. Daneben gab sich Karabelas aber 
> auch sicher, dass die generische Konkurrenz fuer Voltaren, 
> Sandimmun und Clozaril, die ihren Patentschutz fuer 
> verschiedene Anwendungen verloren haben, keineswegs so 
> schmerzhaft sein wird, wie viele Analytiker befuerchten. 
> 
> Zwar gebe es Umsatzeinbussen (vor allem in den USA), aber 
> in Lateinamerika und Asien verfuege Novartis nach wie vor 
> ueber intakte Chancen zur Verteidigung der Positionen. Nach 
> Juerg Reinhardt, Chef der weltweiten Entwicklung, verlaufen 
> die klinische Ueberpruefung und die Einfuehrung der 
> naechsten "Schluesselwerte" (Starlix, Zelmac, E 25 und 
> Visudyne) nach Plan. Reinhardt praesentierte zum Teil auf 
> Fremdschaetzungen beruhende Zahlen, wonach Novartis in den 
> kommenden zwei Jahren mehr "signifikante Produkte" 
> einfuehren werde als Konkurrenten wie Bristol-Myers-Squibb, 
> Glaxo Wellcome, Merck oder Pfizer. Zu der von Reinhardt 
> belegten Effizienzsteigerung in der Entwicklung gehoert 
> nicht zuletzt die Reduktion auf 53 Projekte in den drei 
> Entwicklungsphasen und der Registrierung, gegenueber 75 
> Projekten unmittelbar nach der Fusion im Mai 1997. Wenn 
> alles gut laeuft, sollte Novartis 2003 in der Lage sein, 
> 69% des Umsatzes mit neuen, patentgeschuetzten Produkten zu 
> bestreiten. 1998 hatte dieser Anteil nur 52% betragen. 
> 
> Fokussierung vorantreiben Es gehoert zum Charakter solcher 
> F&E-Praesentationen, dass gute Resultate und begruendete 
> Hoffnungen im Vordergrund stehen. Zum Pharmageschaeft 
> gehoeren aber auch die inhaerenten Risiken der Entwicklung, 
> die dazu fuehren, dass Produkte oft unmittelbar vor der 
> Einfuehrung in Probleme laufen (zumeist wegen unerwarteter 
> Nebenwirkungen), die einen Abbruch erzwingen. Das aktuelle 
> Beispiel dafuer ist die Entwicklung von Amdray als Mittel 
> zur Behandlung von besonderen Formen der Leukaemie. Nach 
> Reinhardt musste die auf Ende 1999 terminierte Registrierung 
> abgeblasen werden. Jetzt besteht nur noch die Hoffnung, 
> dass das Potential von Amdray - mit wohl deutlich 
> reduzierten Umsatzerwartungen - bei der Behandlung von 
> Eierstockkrebs doch noch genutzt werden kann. Der in New 
> York offen auf den Tisch gelegte Fehlschlag illustriert, 
> dass die Hoffnungen auf eine Trendwende - so begruendet sie 
> aus heutiger Optik sein moegen - mit einer Prise Vorsicht 
> genossen werden muessen. Der Beweis fuer die Qualitaet des 
> F&E-Portfolios liegt in den tatsaechlich erbrachten 
> Umsaetzen. Diese Wende wird nach der ebenso offen 
> eingeraeumten Durststrecke, die sich noch ins naechste Jahr 
> hinein erstrecken duerfte, mit Fakten unterlegt werden 
> muessen. Mit Blick auf aktuelle Fragen der Konzernstrategie 
> wollte sich Vasella im uebrigen nicht entlocken lassen, wie 
> Novartis mit der Minderheitsbeteiligung von 49% am 
> kalifornischen Biotechnologie -Unternehmen Chiron zu 
> verfahren gedenkt. Der Entscheid darueber werde am 21. 
> 
> November gefaellt, lautete die lapidare Antwort. Es darf 
> damit weiterhin spekuliert werden, ob es in der Frage der 
> Kontrollmehrheit von Chiron zu einem Machtkampf zwischen 
> Novartis und einem potenten amerikanischen Gegenspieler 
> kommt. Darueber hinaus wiederholte Vasella die bekannte 
> Position, wonach der Verbleib des Agrogeschaefts innerhalb 
> des Konzernverbunds Gegenstand umfassender Abklaerungen 
> sei. Die Bemerkung, die Synergien zwischen Pharma und Agro 
> haetten sich als gering erwiesen, lassen auf eine 
> Abtrennung schliessen, wobei auch hier verschiedene Optionen 
> (vom "spin-off" bis zur Fusion mit einem Konkurrenten) 
> debattiert werden. Fest steht eigentlich nur, dass das nach 
> der Fusion von Ciba und Sandoz propagierte Konzept des 
> integralen "Life-Sciences"-Konzerns zur Disposition steht. 
> 
> Intellektuell hatte es zwar zu ueberzeugen vermocht, aber 
> als treibende Kraft fuer die wirtschaftliche Entwicklung 
> des Konzerns scheint die Tatsache, dass die moderne 
> Biotechnologie mit ihren Hilfsdisziplinen den Schluessel 
> zur Entwicklung von neuen Produkten im Agro- und im 
> Pharmabereich bildet, allein zu wenig gebracht zu haben. 
> 
> LOAD-DATE: September 23, 1999 [Entered September 
> 23, 1999] 
> ===================#===================