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GE - GMO News 09/14 part 1



GMO News 09/14 
1) Greenpeace calls for halt to GMOs as international negotiations open in
Vienna
Vienna, September 15, 1999 
>2) The Australian GeneEthics Network email address has changed -
3) EU pledges united defence of farm policy in WTO By David Evans TAMPERE,
Finland, Sept 14 (Reuters) - 
4) 09/14 1615 SMART PLANT WILL `LIGHT UP' WHEN IT IS THIRSTY By John von
Radowitz, Science Correspondent, PA News 
5)  09/14 1102 French Farmers Protest Sanctions By ANGELA DOLAND PARIS (AP)
-- 
6) 09/14 0819 Industry group to launch GM-free food labels CANBERRA, Australia
(AP) --
7) U.S. urges EU Commission to resolve food disputes By Catherine Bremer
PARIS,
Sept 14 (Reuters) - 
8) AP Worldstream September 14, 1999- U.S. trade ambassador defends sanctions
on European products ANGELA DOLAND PARIS 
9)  Agence France Presse HEADLINE: Genetic food fight heats up BANGKOK,
Sept 14

10) QLD budget a lemon BODY: -Sept 14 AAP 
11) Beattie says budget to rocket Qld into the new age  By Janelle Miles 
BODY: QLD BUDGET SMART BRISBANE, Sept 14 AAP - 
12) AAP NEWSFEED September 14, 1999 Nationwide General News; Finance Wire 
*Qld
gov budgets for $21 mln underlying 3 Brisbane 
13)AAP NEWSFEED September 14, 1999 - Nationwide General News; Finance Wire 
BODY: - Preliminary Final Report/press TIMBERCORP MORE THAN TRIPLES NET
PROFIT 
14) Daily Record September 14, 1999 -GM FARMS KEPT SECRET IN BID TO BEAT
PROTESTS 
15)  The Guardian (London) September 14, 1999 -Guardian City Pages; - GM seed
sellers named in lawsuit 
BYLINE: Jane Martinson in New York 
16) the Guardian (London) September 14, 1999 Guardian leader Pages - 
Science on the slide; If we fail here, we fail everywhere else 

1) Greenpeace calls for halt to GMOs as international negotiations open in
Vienna
Vienna, September 15, 1999 

Greenpeace today demanded the international 
delegates gathered to Vienna to set strong environmental controls for 
genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The organisation demonstrated in front 
the United Nations building in Vienna where the Biosafety Protocol
negotiations

are being held. Activists dressed as genetically engineered maize and tomato 
waltzed with Bill Clinton and Tony Blair and held up banners demanding, 'Stop 
GMOs - Biosafety Now!', 'Stop playing dirty games'.
'Governments have so far dodged their responsibility to protect the
environment

from genetic pollution,' said Greenpeace political advisor Louise Gale. 'Even 
though citizens in a growing number of countries across the world are
rejecting

genetically engineered food, governments have done precious little to draft 
global rules to address the public's concerns. International biosafety rules
are 
needed now more than ever to give countries the right to say no to GMOs.'
The US with other grain exporting countries like Canada, Australia and
Argentina 
have been the strongest opponents of all environmental clauses in the
Biosafety

Protocol. The previous round of protocol negotiations collapsed in Colombia 
earlier this year mainly due to the opposition of the group.
Greenpeace is calling for precaution to be the basis of all decisions on GMOs 
since the long term effects of this new technology are mostly unknown and
what 
is known causes concern. Any government should have a right to stop any
import 
of GMOs if it suspects there may be environmental or health risks.
The Biosafety Protocol is the first attempt by the international community to 
set binding rules for the use, transport and handling of GMOs. The US is
not a 
party to the process since it has not ratified the Biodiversity Convention.
Note to editors: 
Images of the Greenpeace demonstration are available from the 
Greenpeace International Photo Desk, + 31.20.5249 580 
Greenpeace Biosafety Press Briefings are available at the Greenpeace 
International internet site: www.greenpeace.org/~geneng
For more information: 
Mika Railo, Press Officer, Greenpeace International, +31.6.212 969 08 
Gertraud Findl, Press Officer, Greenpeace Austria, +0664 333 73 89
======================
2) The Australian GeneEthics Network email address has changed -
Messages to their address will bounce after September 30, 1999, so please 
change your address books now.
=======================
3) EU pledges united defence of farm policy in WTO By David Evans TAMPERE,
Finland, Sept 14 (Reuters) - 

European Union 
> farm ministers on Tuesday presented a united front in 
> defending the bloc's Common Agricultural Policy in new 
> global trade talks and recognised they would have to go on 
> the offensive to counter attacks from the United States and 
> others. "We are entering the new round with a far more 
> unified position than we went into the last (Uruguay) 
> round," European Farm Commissioner Franz Fischler told a 
> news conference after a two-day informal meeting in the 
> Finnish city of Tampere. The United States and the Cairns 
> Group, which includes Australia and New Zealand, want 
> agriculture at the heart of the so-called Millennium Round 
> and see the EU's CAP as an outdated market-distorting 
> policy. They will target two of its central planks -- the 
> use of export subsidies to compensate for high internal 
> prices for agricultural goods and direct aid payments to 
> farmers. Both remain central to the EU's reformed farm 
> policy agreed earlier this year, which eroded some price 
> support but compensated farmers through higher direct aid. 
> 
> All ministers agreed that the latest reforms should form 
> the basis of the EU's negotiating position. And it also 
> became clear that the EU wants to include provisions on 
> animal welfare, environmental protection and food safety 
> issues in the new global trade accord. That could provide a 
> legal base for the EU's health-based trade embargoes such 
> as one on hormone-treated beef from the United States. It 
> could also help solve the row over genetically modified 
> organisms. Fischler said the EU might have to give some 
> ground on the use of export subsidies, but only in 
> conjunction with other parties giving up some of their 
> domestic support arrangements. He singled out U.S. export 
> credit as a way in which the United States not only helps 
> its farmers but also reduces domestic surpluses. And last 
> year's $6 billion emergency farm aid programme in the 
> United States showed the EU was not alone in handing out 
> direct aid to farmers. The EU's combative tone was taken up 
> by French Farm Minister Jean Glavany, who said the EU 
> should not go into the talks on the back foot. "We need to 
> be aggressive. There is no need to present ourselves as the 
> bad pupils of the class," he said. UK Farm Minister Nick 
> Brown said part of the negotiating process would involve 
> "taking a very close look at other countries' agricultural 
> systems." However, EU officials said the united front 
> masked slight differences of opinion on how far the EU's 
> protected farm markets should be opened up in the future. 
> 
> Countries such as Britain, Sweden, Denmark and the 
> Netherlands are more favourable towards liberalised markets 
> than others in the bloc. These differences will have to be 
> settled at the next meeting of EU farm ministers in 
> Brussels on September 27, which is when they will finalise 
> their negotiating position. 
> 
> Executive News Svc. 
> [Entered September 14, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 

4) 09/14 1615 SMART PLANT WILL `LIGHT UP' WHEN IT IS THIRSTY By John von
Radowitz, Science Correspondent, PA News 

Plants that signal when they need water are being developed by 
> British scientists, it was disclosed today. The "sentinel" 
> plants are genetically engineered to glow under an 
> ultra-violet light when thirsty. Their warning signal is 
> derived from a gene taken from a fluorescent jellyfish. 
> 
> Scientists at Edinburgh University and the Scottish Office 
> are pioneering the work by conducting experiments on 
> potatoes. They say the "smart" plants could help farmers as 
> well as showing up nutrient deficiencies in agricultural 
> produce. They may even find a place in the domestic garden 
> or window box. Details of the research were revealed at the 
> British Association Festival of Science at Sheffield 
> University. Dr Ann Haley from Edinburgh University said: 
> "Smart plants can assist in precision farming by acting as 
> sentinels in a field of crops and report on their status 
> within set parameters. "When the smart plant goes 
> fluorescent it needs attention, for example, it needs more 
> water. "It can be a problem to assess the amount of water a 
> plant needs. "We've been told by farmers that the existing 
> monitoring methods are not very effective. The condition of 
> the soil is not a good guide." She said giving a crop of 
> potatoes precisely the right amount of water can increase 
> the yield three-fold. Executive News Svc. 
> 
> ===================#=================== 
5)  09/14 1102 French Farmers Protest Sanctions By ANGELA DOLAND PARIS (AP)
-- 

The head of the U.S. International 
> Trade Administration defended American sanctions on 
> European products, saying Tuesday that they were necessary 
> to counter a European ban on hormone-treated beef. "Our 
> beef can't be sold at all in Europe," said David L. Aaron, 
> undersecretary of commerce for international trade. "Even 
> though there are (U.S.) tariffs on European products, they 
> can and will be sold in the United States." 
> 
> Angry French farmers held more protests this week against 
> the U.S. policy, which they claim has unfairly targeted 
> their products. The farmers also are opposed to giant 
> supermarkets chains, which they say charge low prices. "I 
> feel for farmers in France -- and in the United States -- 
> who are facing world prices that are the lowest they've 
> been since the Great Depression," said Aaron, in Paris for 
> meetings on e-commerce and the health industry. In July, 
> the United States levied $124 million in sanctions on a 
> variety of European products to counter Europe's refusal to 
> import hormone-treated U.S. beef. Delicacies such as 
> Roquefort and foie gras were slapped with 100 percent 
> tariffs. About 90 percent of the beef produced in the 
> United States and Canada uses hormones approved by the 
> regulatory U.S. Food and Drug Administration to make cattle 
> grow faster and bigger. But many Europeans fear that the 
> treated meat could pose a health threat. Aaron said 
> Europeans should reconsider their "anxiety" about 
> hormone-treated beef and genetically modified food. "We 
> should urge Europe to confront these issues in practical, 
> scientific ways, like in a Europe-wide food and drug 
> administration, instead of catering to public anxiety," 
> Aaron said. French farmers who fear the loss of culinary 
> and agricultural traditions have vandalized McDonald's 
> restaurants and dumped tons of fruit on public squares in 
> nationwide protests for the past several weeks. The 
> protesters initially denounced the U.S. sanctions, but 
> their protest quickly widened to include everything that 
> symbolizes American "hegemony" in trade and agriculture, and 
> globalization, which many see as a danger to their way of 
> life. 
> 
> ===================#=================== 

6) 09/14 0819 Industry group to launch GM-free food labels CANBERRA, Australia
(AP) --

A new Australian consortium said 
> Tuesday it will launch a label and certification process for 
> foods which do not contain genetically modified products. 
> 
> KPMG consultant Roger Hussey is organizing the move in 
> conjunction with U.S.-based food testing company Genetic ID 
> and food industry representatives. "Our idea was to get 
> together a group of companies who had a strong interest in 
> preserving the food chain," Hussey said. "We decided, with 
> their agreement, to form the certified food consortium." 
> 
> The group hopes to launch a certification and testing 
> process, whereby members use an industry-backed mark of 
> quality on their products, within the next two months. "It 
> is like a badge of integrity," Hussey said. He refused to 
> reveal the names of the 10 to 12 companies involved, but 
> said they include retail, distribution, fresh food 
> producers, processed food representatives and large-scale 
> exporters. "The consortium will be an open consortium and 
> will attempt to gain wide membership from right across the 
> food industry," Hussey said. He said the group would 
> consult farmers, consumer groups and other key players. "It 
> is the launching pad for GM-free food in Australia, because 
> without it you can't have GM-free food." 
> 
> While there are testing provisions for food already in 
> place in Australia, the availability of GM-tested products 
> is minimal, Hussey said. Figures for the amount of 
> genetically altered food sold in Australia were not 
> immediately available. 
> 
> Executive News Svc. 
> ===================#=================== 

7) U.S. urges EU Commission to resolve food disputes By Catherine Bremer
PARIS,
Sept 14 (Reuters) - 
A U.S.  government trade delegation will this week urge the new EU 
> Commission to move towards resolving transatlantic trade 
> disputes over food, a U.S. commerce official said on 
> Tuesday. David Aaron, undersecretary for international 
> trade in the U.S. Commerce Department, told a news briefing 
> the United States was losing patience with European 
> resistance to genetically modified crops and its decade-old 
> ban on U.S. hormone-treated beef. But he said the new team 
> of EU Commissioners due to be voted in on Wednesday could 
> break the deadlock on these two key issues, which threaten 
> to disrupt global trade talks later this year. "The EU has 
> a unique opportunity here to take a step back and try out a 
> fresh approach to this," Aaron said, ahead of talks with 
> French government officials in Paris and EU officials in 
> Brussels and Finland, the country which currently holds the 
> EU presidency. "We've got to get back to science -- there's 
> no other way to assess these issues. The principle of 
> caution is all very well but not to the extent that you 
> never leave the house." 
> 
> While it lacks scientific proof that hormone-treated beef 
> or gene-modified food pose health risks, the EU faces wide 
> public concern over food safety and is reluctant to approve 
> either while a shadow of doubt remains. Aside from the beef 
> ban, the EU's de facto moratorium on gene crops has blocked 
> sales of U.S. maize to Europe for many months. BIG MISTAKE 
> Aaron said Europe would make an enormous mistake if it 
> turned its back on bio-engineering, which he said would 
> dominate the next century. The EU should focus on setting 
> up a regulatory and scientific framework for the technology 
> in Europe. "It's time for EU governments to stop running 
> away from public opinion and hysteria and start getting to 
> grips with it," he said. Aaron added that while he 
> sympathised with French gourmet food producers hit by 
> retaliatory U.S. import duties, the U.S. cattle industry 
> had faced a closed door to Europe for 11 years. "I feel for 
> the farmers, they are under enormous pressure (from low 
> prices) and I understand their anger," he said. "But the 
> fact is, though there are tariffs on some EU products, they 
> can and will still be sold in the U.S. but our beef can't 
> be sold here at all." 
> 
> Executive News Svc. 
> ===================#=================== 
8) AP Worldstream September 14, 1999- U.S. trade ambassador defends sanctions
on European products ANGELA DOLAND PARIS 

BODY: The head of the U.S. 
> 
> International Trade Administration defended American 
> sanctions on European products on Tuesday, saying they were 
> necessary to counter a European ban on hormone- treated 
> beef. ''I feel for farmers in France and in the United 
> States who are facing world prices that are the lowest 
> they've been since the Great Depression,'' said David L. 
> 
> Aaron, undersecretary of commerce for international trade. 
> Angry French farmers held more protests this week against 
> the U.S. policy, which they claim has unfairly targeted 
> their products. The farmers also are opposed to giant 
> supermarkets chains, which they say bring low prices for 
> their products. ''Our beef can't be sold at all in 
> Europe,'' said Aaron, in Paris for meetings on commerce and 
> the health industry. ''Even though there are (U.S.) tariffs 
> on European products, they can and will be sold in the 
> United States.'' In July, the United States levied dlrs 124 
> million in sanctions on a variety of European products to 
> counter Europe's refusal to import hormone- treated U.S. 
> 
> beef. Delicacies such as Roquefort and foie gras were 
> slapped with 100 percent tariffs. About 90 percent of the 
> beef produced in the United States and Canada uses hormones 
> approved by the regulatory U.S. Food and Drug 
> Administration to make cattle grow faster and bigger. But 
> many Europeans fear that the treated meat could pose a 
> health threat. Aaron said Europeans should reconsider their 
> ''anxiety'' about hormone-treated beef and genetically 
> modified food. ''We should urge Europe to confront these 
> issues in practical, scientific ways, like in a Europe-wide 
> food and drug administration, instead of catering to public 
> anxiety,'' Aaron said. Also on Tuesday, a task force of the 
> Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development met 
> in Paris to prepare international recommendations on 
> genetically modified food, including safety issues. At a 
> news conference, task force members stressed that they were 
> in the beginning stages of coming up with food safety 
> suggestions to be presented at a July summit of the Group of 
> Eight, the world's leading industrialized nations. The task 
> force is expected to discuss, among many topics, the 
> possibility of an international regulatory agency on food 
> safety. Genetically modified food and hormone-treated beef 
> have been headline topics in France since mid-August, with 
> French farmers mounting a campaign against ''foul food.'' 
> Fearing the loss of culinary and agricultural traditions, 
> radical farmers' groups have vandalized McDonald's 
> restaurants and dumped tons of fruit on public squares 
> around the country. The protesters initially denounced the 
> U.S. sanctions, but their protest quickly widened to 
> include everything that symbolizes American ''hegemony'' in 
> trade and agriculture, and globalization, which many see as 
> a danger to their way of life. (ad-dgs-eg) 
> ===================#=================== 
9)  Agence France Presse HEADLINE: Genetic food fight heats up BANGKOK,
Sept 14


BODY: Commercial food giant 
> Monsanto hit out Tuesday at non- governmental and 
> traditional farming organisations over their reluctance to 
> embrace genetically modified crops and other biotechnology 
> advances. Monsanto Asia-Pacific research director Paul Teng 
> warned of "dangerous anti-science elements emerging in 
> Asia," at a crop development conference here. 
> 
> Non-governmental groups have warned not enough research 
> has been carried out into the environmental and health 
> impact of genetically modified crops. Large foreign 
> agriculture firms are at the forefront of genetically 
> modified crop development and are reportedly pioneering seed 
> that becomes sterile after its first growing season. 
> 
> Critics have labelled it the "Terminator seed" and warned 
> it will increase reliance on commercial agriculture firms 
> and wipe out small farmers who use seed from one crop to 
> plant another. Teng said some NGOs have unrealistic ideas 
> about small-scale farming. "There is nothing romantic about 
> using animal and human labour for farming," Teng said, 
> saying rice production must more than double to meet demand 
> in the year 2020. "It is nice to think that farm is 
> sustainable and meets the needs of one farming family, but 
> who is going to feed the people in the cities?" he said. 
> 
> Teng said genetically modified crops can produce bigger 
> yields than conventional ones and were more resistant to 
> disease, pests and environmental stresses. "The argument 
> that traditional varieties are more resistant to disease 
> than modified strains is a myth," he said. He warned that 
> small-scale farming was doomed and that new advances in 
> bio-technology must be embraced to avoid food shortages. 
> 
> "We are always asked to prove is it safe. I think we should 
> look at it the other way round and ask is it not safe?" Teng 
> said. Another speaker at the Asia Pacific Crop Protection 
> Association conference warned the media was whipping up 
> unreasonable fears about genetically modified organisms. 
> 
> "This is not just the radical green press but the 
> mainstream media," said John Skerritt, of the Australian 
> Centre for International Agricultural Research. Eleven 
> different types of genetically engineered crops are 
> currently being tested in Thailand, but none have been 
> granted government approval. gw- col/kf LOAD-DATE: 
> September 14, 1999 [Entered September 14, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
10) QLD budget a lemon BODY: -Sept 14 AAP 

- Queensland Opposition 
> leader Rob Borbidge today labelled the state government's 
> budget a lemon, just hours before the document was due to 
> be delivered. Mr Borbidge said the government would bring 
> down a budget with its priorities the city's super stadium 
> and genetically - modified food and not victims of child 
> abuse. He was referring to a recommendation of the 
> recently-concluded Forde inquiry into child abuse in 
> state-run institutions that funding for child protection 
> increase by $103 million. Premier Peter Beattie said last 
> night there would be an increase in such funding but not in 
> the order of $103 million, saying he wanted to use the 
> money for service not "building bureaucracy". Mr Borbidge 
> also accused the government of a plan to take funding from 
> vital services in order to fund a sneaky six per cent tax 
> on capital works, with he called a Beattie Stealth Tax or 
> BST. He said the tax would be slugged on all capital works 
> spending from July next year on schools, hospitals, road 
> projects and police stations. "We know we are going to see 
> a budget during the course of this day where the priorities 
> will be wrong," he said. "We are about to see a premier and 
> acting Treasurer bring down a budget where the priorities 
> will be Lang Park and genetically -modified food. "I think 
> we are about to see a budget, in the recent history of 
> Queensland, which well be deemed to be a very bad budget." 
> 
> ===================#=================== 
11) Beattie says budget to rocket Qld into the new age  By Janelle Miles 
BODY: QLD BUDGET SMART BRISBANE, Sept 14 AAP - 

Queensland's millennium budget would 
> provide a launchpad for the state to rocket into the New 
> Age, Premier Peter Beattie said today. Mr Beattie announced 
> new spending in biotechnology, information technology and 
> telecommunications aimed at transforming Queensland into 
> the "smart state". "I'm determined that Queensland will not 
> simply be regarded as a farm or a quarry, and that's what 
> this is all about," he said. "A budget can simply be a 
> giant slot machine where taxation dollars are fed in at one 
> end and they emerge in tiles for various services and 
> infrastructure at the other end. "Or it can be a powerful 
> vehicle to reshape society and thrust it in a new direction. 
> "That's what this budget does." 
> 
> The Premier said during 1999/2000, $20 million would be 
> allocated to major new biotechnological research centres in 
> southeast Queensland. He said $77.5 million would be spent 
> over 10 years towards the Institute of Molecular Bioscience 
> at the University of Queensland which would become 
> Australia's largest biological research facility. "By 2002 
> we'll have something like 750 scientists researching 
> there," he said. Another $8 million would be spent over 
> four years on the Centre for Biomolecular Science and Drug 
> Discovery at Griffith University's Gold Coast campus and $5 
> million this financial year toward the Comprehensive Cancer 
> Research Centre at the Queensland Institute of Medical 
> Research. Mr Beattie said the government's investment in 
> bioindustries would create thousands of sustainable jobs 
> long into the next century. "No previous budget has sought 
> to buy Queensland a position as the Australian leader in a 
> new technology or new industry, opening the way for 
> thousands of long-term new age jobs," Mr Beattie said. 
> 
> "This will be remembered as the budget that propelled 
> Queensland into a new age, in particular the age of 
> biotechnology. " Mr Beattie said the budget laid the 
> foundations for Queensland's development as the 
> technological and intellectual hub of the Asia-Pacific 
> region. The government will allocate $10 million over three 
> years to enhance "supercomputing" facilities at the 
> University of Queensland. Another $55 million would be 
> spent to enhance information technology-based learning and 
> infrastructure in Queensland schools. "My government will 
> target a ratio of one computer for every five students," 
> the Premier said. "The first milestone towards this 
> strategy will be the achievement of one computer to every 
> 7.5 students by 2001." 
> ===================#=================== 
12) AAP NEWSFEED September 14, 1999 Nationwide General News; Finance Wire 
*Qld
gov budgets for $21 mln underlying 3 Brisbane 
> BODY: BUDGET QLD 3 Brisbane Mr Beattie said the budget 
> provides initial funding for his government's $270 million, 
> 10-year plan to create thousands of sustainable jobs in 
"bioindustries". The government has allocated $20 million 
> for three new biotechnological research centres in 
> south-east Queensland. Mr Beattie said $81 million has been 
> allocated for targeted labour market programs in 1999/00, 
> under his "Breaking the Unemployment Cycle" initiative 
> established last year. He said funding of $24.9 million 
> over four years, including $6.9 million in 1999/00, has 
> been allocated for the QBuild Apprentice program, enabling 
> the employment of 238 apprentices this year over and above 
> the industry standard. LANGUAGE: ENGLISH LOAD-DATE: 
> September 14, 1999 [Entered September 14, 1999] 
> ===================#=================== 
13)AAP NEWSFEED September 14, 1999 - Nationwide General News; Finance Wire 
BODY: - Preliminary Final Report/press TIMBERCORP MORE THAN TRIPLES NET
PROFIT 
> release/a 1/5 (M) Comnews TIM Sydney 9223/1/5 TIM - ASX 
> Company Announcement {ak3} THIS IS A PRIORITY ITEM 13 
> September 1999 Part 1/5 TIMBERCORP LIMITED HOMEX - 
> Melbourne - Preliminary Final Report/press 
> release/acquisition TIMBERCORP MORE THAN TRIPLES NET PROFIT 
> Listed plantation investment manager Timbercorp Limited 
> today announces an after tax operating profit of $18.02 
> million (1998 $5.53m) for the year to 30 June 1999. This 
> profit results largely from sales of the company's forestry 
> services from its 1998 Project prospectus. The 1999 profit 
> was enhanced by the contribution from the company's 
> forestry arm, Timbercorp Treefarms, which was responsible 
> for some 50% of the forestry establishment works arising 
> from the 1998 prospectus. The company's loan book, also 
> contributed strongly to profit. Following its extraordinary 
> general meeting on 31 August 1999, the company changed its 
> name from Timbercorp Eucalypts Limited to Timbercorp 
> Limited and effected a 10 for one share split. As a result 
> of this split each ordinary share was replaced with 10 
> post-split shares. The purpose of the share split was to 
> enhance liquidity in the shares with a view to expanding 
> the share base of the company. Accordingly, the share split 
> should be taken into account when reviewing the results 
> lodged by the company. The Directors have declared a final 
> fully franked dividend of 2 cents per share (20 cents pre 
> subdivision) compared with an unfranked dividend of 1 cent 
> per share (10 cents pre subdivision) for the previous 
> corresponding period. This will bring total dividends for 
> the year to 3.5 cents per share (35 cents pre subdivision), 
> fully franked compared with an unfranked dividend of 1.6 
> cents (16 cents pre subdivision) for 1998. Importantly, 
> profit for the half-year ended 30 June 1999 was $11.2 
> million compared with $1.6 million for the corresponding 
> half year ended 30 June 1998. This shows that the majority 
> of the 1999 profit was derived in the second half of the 
> financial year. As the company brings income to account on 
> a works completed basis, the second half-year bias will be 
> greater in the 2000 financial year than in previous year 
> due to the timing of plantings under the 1999 Project. 
> 
> Significantly, sales of forestry services achieved to June 
> 1999 exceeded 25,000 hectares (1998 approx. 10,500 
> hectares), a level substantially in excess of forecast 
> levels. Income from these sales will be brought to account 
> during the 2000 financial year. As a result of this growth 
> in sales together with the increasing contribution from the 
> company's forestry arm and its finance operations, the 
> company expects strong profit and dividend growth in 2000. 
> 
> With approaching limits in the amount of suitable land in 
> its traditional areas, the company will capitalise on its 
> position as a primary production funds manager by developing 
> complementary projects. Some of these projects will focus 
> on new areas and further species. Others will operate in 
> complementary industries. The company will also expand its 
> technology base over the coming year. Today, it announces 
> that it has reached agreement to acquire biotechnology 
> company Silvagene Pty Ltd. Silvagene is one of the industry 
> leaders in the genetic improvement of eucalypt species. 
> 
> Silvagene, which currently supplies the majority of its 
> genetic seed to Timbercorp, is a profitable company that 
> will share great synergies with Timbercorp. It is 
> Timbercorp's intention to substantially expand the business 
> of Silvagene both in Australia and overseas. Timbercorp is 
> also working on establishing strategic alliances with 
> several key participants in the plantation forestry 
> industry. Another opportunity for the company is the recent 
> developments in trading of carbon credits. Recently, the 
> Sydney Futures Exchange and State Forests of NSW announced 
> that they have signed a memorandum of understanding to 
> develop the world's first exchange-traded market for carbon 
> sequestration credits. As one of Australia's largest 
> plantation managers, Timbercorp will closely monitor 
> developments in the trading of carbon credits with a view 
> to taking advantage of any opportunities that present 
> themselves. With an improving outlook in the Asian region 
> and the company's commitment to technology and developing 
> new projects, the Directors are comfortable with the current 
> direction of the Company. For further information contact: 
> David Muir EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Telephone (03) 9670 4060 

> ===================#=================== 
14) Daily Record September 14, 1999 -GM FARMS KEPT SECRET IN BID TO BEAT
PROTESTS 
BYLINE: James Hardy 
BODY: FARMS growing 
> genetically modified crops could be kept secret in future 
> in a move to beat hardline green activists. The Government 
> said yesterday they were prepared to stop publishing 
> details of the farms' locations. Ministers are furious at a 
> series of attacks which have seen GM crops destroyed. 
> 
> Farmers have warned they are sitting targets for 
> environmental campaigners. Cabinet Office Minister Jack 
> Cunningham condemned the attacks as "anti -science". He 
> said: "We cannot allow a situation to continue where 
> premeditated vandalism and physical destruction of other 
> people's property prevents us building up the scientific 
> knowledge we need to make properly informed decisions. "I 
> would have thought anyone who cares about the environment 
> would want the tests to go ahead in an open and balanced 
> way so everyone can have access to what is useful and 
> important information." 
> 
> Sir Richard Sykes, chairman of the British Association for 
> the Advancement of Science, yesterday warned crucial 
> scientific research was being jeopardised. Green 
> campaigners claim the farm trials of GM crops is dangerous 
> because their impact on the environment is unknown. 
> 
> Greenpeace's Dr Douglas Parr said: "If science is to 
> progress and serve the best interests of the public, the 
> industry should redirect the public money it is ploughing 
> into this unwanted, unpredictable technology into research 
> into sustainable organic agriculture." 
> 
> ===================#=================== 
15)  The Guardian (London) September 14, 1999 -Guardian City Pages; - GM seed
sellers named in lawsuit 
BYLINE: Jane Martinson in New York 
BODY: Jane 
> Martinson in New York A grass roots farming organisation 
> yesterday demonstrated against companies which sell 
> genetically modified seeds as it prepared to launch a 
> groundbreaking multi-billion dollar antitrust lawsuit. Some 
> of the largest life science companies in the world are to 
> be targeted by a lawsuit brought by the US-based National 
> Family Farm Coalition and the Foundation on Economic Trends 
> - an American group set up by Jeremy Rifkin, the 
> bio-technology opponent. Members of the coalition planned 
> to meet White House officials yesterday after demonstrating 
> against the behaviour of companies such as Monsanto and 
> DuPont of the US and Novartis, the Swiss life science 
> group. The massive lawsuit, set to be launched in several 
> countries later this year, alleges that just a handful of 
> companies exert a damaging control over food production 
> around the world. This control, which is exerted through 
> the leasing of seeds rather than the sale of them, is 
> especially damaging in emerging economies, the lawsuit 
> alleges. However, Novartis vigorously defended itself and 
> other companies against the allegations yesterday. A 
> Novartis spokesman said: 'We believe there is no evidence 
> to support an allegation of market control on which the 
> proposed lawsuit appears to be based." 
> ===================#=================== 

16) the Guardian (London) September 14, 1999 Guardian leader Pages - 
Science on the slide; If we fail here, we fail everywhere else 
BODY: In Cambridge 
> yesterday, Tony Blair launched the government's 
> long-awaited policy on electronic commerce. In Sheffield, 
> where the British Association is holding its annual 
> conference, Sir Richard Sykes, head of Glaxo, warned that 
> Britain was in danger of falling behind in the application 
> of science. These two events are connected. If Britain does 
> not improve its scientific and technological base, then the 
> country will not have sufficient goods to sell through 
> electronic commerce on the internet. The government needs 
> to listen to Sir Richard's warning, for two reasons. First, 
> he knows what he is talking about. He is not an academic 
> scientist using the BA to take pot shots at the government. 
> Glaxo is a model company of its kind. It has come from 
> nowhere in 25 years to become a major force in the world 
> pharmaceutical industry. Its own spending on research and 
> development is so large that it distorts industry's 
> average. If more companies could match Glaxo's spend, there 
> would be no problem. But they do not; so there is. A 
> typical company only spent between 0.4% and 2.2% of sales 
> on R&D. Only the pharmaceutical industry hit double figures. 
> The second reason for taking him seriously is that the 
> government may think it is doing enough already. It is 
> clearly taking educational reform - vital for future 
> development - very seriously and last year, to its credit, 
> it announced a significant increase in the public 
> contribution to R&D. But, as Sir Richard points out, this 
> was merely making up for some of the chronic underspending 
> in the past. Last year, Japan, a country suffering a 
> serious recession, managed to increase its civil spending 
> on R&D by more than the entire UK civil R&D budget. 
> 
> Although Britain still somehow manages to punch above its 
> weight (UK universities publish 5% of the world's scientific 
> literature with only 1% of the population) the base from 
> which this happens is eroding. There may be a continuing 
> improvement in examination results but, as Sir Richard 
> reminds us, the number of students applying for engineering 
> courses at university is only 64% of what it was five years 
> ago (with physics at 80%, chemistry 68% and biology 72%). 
> 
> There are lots of other things wrong as well - we have not 
> got the technology transfer right from our science base to 
> industry, and our venture capital base (though rapidly 
> improving with regard to internet start-up companies) is 
> still weak compared with that of the US. Last year Britain 
> invested pounds 350m in 'early stage' companies compared 
> with pounds 5.8bn in the US. Nor have we got the dialogue 
> right between science, government and the public. This is 
> illustrated by the groundswell of resistance among 
> environmentalists to even the testing of GM foods and by 
> local resistance to the Wellcome Trust's plans to develop a 
> biotechnology park by its Hinton Hall campus in Cambridge. 
> 
> The government thinks highly of science - but not so highly 
> that it is prepared to have a minister for science in the 
> cabinet. It also thinks -absolutely rightly - that the 
> implementation of e-commerce is an urgent priority if 
> companies are to survive in the information age. But not so 
> urgent a priority, apparently, that the new e-commerce 
> envoy (confirmed yesterday) needs to start before January. 
> 
> In the world of the internet, three months is a lifetime. 
> In the end it is all a question of priorities and the 
> ability to translate national strategies, whether for 
> education or science, into success on the ground. In that 
> field, sadly, we still have a great deal to learn. 
> 
> ===================#===================