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GMO-FREE REGIONS & REGULATION: South Australia to continue GM crops ban



                                  PART 1


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TITLE:  SOUTH AUSTRALIA TO CONTINUE GM CROPS BAN

SOURCE: Food Week online, Australia

AUTHOR: 

URL:    http://www.foodweek.com.au/main-features-page.aspx?articleType=ArticleView&articleId=2987

DATE:   01.12.2008

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SOUTH AUSTRALIA TO CONTINUE GM CROPS BAN

The South Australian government says its moratorium on genetically modified crops will remain, even though the Bureau of Rural Sciences has found that genetically modified canola crops would make the industry more sustainable. The bureau says GM crops make pest and weed management easier and are likely to increase crop yields. Agriculture Minister Rory McEwen says GM crops pose too much of a risk on the green image of industries such as wine. ?I think the people of South Australia have said very loud and clearly ?we want to keep the moratorium in place?,? he said. ?There are enormous perceived risks in the market place if we start growing GMs, the wine industry in particular, now one of South Australia?s most significant export industries, is saying we want a clean and green image.?



                                  PART 2

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TITLE:  GRAPEVINE GENE HOPE

SOURCE: Weekly Times, Australia

AUTHOR: Leslie White

URL:    http://www.weeklytimesnow.com.au/article/2008/11/24/28611_horticulture.html

DATE:   24.11.2008

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GRAPEVINE GENE HOPE

THE use of grapevine genetics as a tool against drought will be discussed at an international wine industry conference which begins in Adelaide today.

The 8th International Symposium on Grapevine Physiology and Biotechnology - being held at the University of Adelaide?s National Wine Centre from 24-28 November - will attract about 200 delegates from countries around the globe, including some of the world?s biggest wine-producing nations.

The grapevine genome was mapped this year and the knowledge gained will allow for much greater understanding of how the plant works, according to the conference co-chair, University of Adelaide Professor of Viticulture Steve Tyerman.

?It helps us work out what makes a red grape red, compared to a green grape like a riesling - or what makes some vines more tolerant of drought compared to others,? Prof Tyerman told The Weekly Times.

?The information can be used for basic understanding but (also offers) the potential to select better varieties for certain conditions, or to use to genetically modified roots in future to cope with climate change better.?

Water shortages and poorer water quality would be the major impacts of climate change, meaning vines which used water more efficiently to produce quality fruit needed to be developed, according to Prof Tyerman.

This was possible through the manipulation of some genes, he said.

?At the moment there?s not much acceptance (of the idea), as consumers are not that keen yet on genetically modified vines - but they might be if it comes to the crunch,? Prof Tyerman said.

Speakers from the US, Chile, France, Italy, Germany and New Zealand will attend the conference.

Prof Tyerman said the conference would be a massive networking opportunity. A newly formed wine innovation cluster, which brought five research organisations together under one roof at the University of Adelaide, had already attracted interest from industry overseas, he said.

For more information on the symposium, visit www.asvo.com.au/8isgpb/


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