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APPROVAL: Minnesota (USA) gives thumbs up to Syngenta,Pioneer/DowAgroSciences Herculex RW GE maize



                                 PART I
------------------------------- GENET-news -------------------------------
TITLE:  Minnesota gives thumbs up to Syngenta, Pioneer/DowAgroSciences
        rootworm events
SOURCE: Agriculture Online, USA
AUTHOR: Gil Gullickson
URL:    http://www.agriculture.com/ag/story.jhtml?storyid=/templatedata/
ag/story/data/1177707653473.xml&catref=ag1001
DATE:   27.04.2007
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Minnesota gives thumbs up to Syngenta, Pioneer/DowAgroSciences rootworm events

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) granted on Friday a
commercial use exemption to Herculex RW, a rootworm event developed and
sold by Pioneer Hi-Bred International and Dow AgroSciences.

This comes on the heels of the MDA issuing earlier this week a stop-sale
order to Dow AgroSciences halting further distribution or sale to
Minnesota farmers of DAS-59122-7, the rootworm-resistant trait in
Herculex RW and traits stacks found in some Pioneer and Mycogen brand seed.

The move came after MDA learned that Dow AgroSciences did not seek the
required regulatory permission to sell this product in Minnesota. State
law requires companies to obtain a commercial use exemption before
allowing the sale of genetically modified (GMO) seed.

Earlier this month, the MDA issued the same stop-sale order for
Syngenta's Agrisure RW trait. All companies involved with these two
products satisfied requirements to obtain the commercial use exemption.

"Minnesota is the only state in the U.S. with a commercial use exemption
for GMO crops," says Tom Gahm, head of communications for Syngenta
Seeds. After supplying the MDA with the required technical information,
the MDA granted the commercial use exemption to Syngenta.

Both products had received federal approval. "Once the USDA has given
approval to a product, in this case the specific traits, the MDA wants
to review the USDA documentation along with the EPA documentation," says
Margaret Hart, MDA communications coordinator. "It's an extra step the
state of Minnesota takes to examine any perceived threats to the
environment or human health."


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                                 PART
------------------------------- GENET-news -------------------------------
TITLE:  Ethanol boom needs distillers grains exports
SOURCE: Agriculture Online, USA
AUTHOR: Dan Looker
URL:    http://www.agriculture.com/ag/story.jhtml?storyid=/templatedata/
ag/story/data/1178031832435.xml&catref=ag1001
DATE:   01.05.2007
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Ethanol boom needs distillers grains exports

In 2006 the U.S. ethanol industry produced a record 12 million metric
tons of distillers grains but with new plants coming online this year,
2007 production could hit 17 million tons, says Geoff Cooper, director
of ethanol and business development at the National Corn Growers
Association. Last year about a tenth of U.S. producion of distillers
grains was exported.

"The growth that we're looking at in one year is unprecedented," he said.

It took some 20 years to develop a domestic market for the main
byproduct of dry grind ethanol plants, dried distillers grains and
solubles (DDGS). So the industry is understandably nervous about keeping
its foreign buyers happy. And that's why NCGA is urging corn farmers who
plant Agrisure RW to keep the crop separated from corn destined for
exports. So far, only New Zealand has agreed to import the genetically
modified corn, although other nations are expected to approve its use in
the future.

"The growth markets in the last two to three years have been in the
Pacific Rim as well as Mexico and Canada," Cooper told Agriculture Online.

Mexico is by far the biggest customer of DDGS, buying 367,000 metric
tons last year, or 29%, Cooper said. The next six importers, in order of
their purchases, were Ireland, Canada, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, the
Philippines and Japan. But even Japan's 45,000 metric tons last year
represented a huge increase from almost nothing two years ago.

Ireland and the United Kingdom, both members of the European Union, are
importing about half the amount they did five years ago, Cooper said.
The growth in imports of U.S. DDGS has been in the Pacific and in North
America.


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