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TITLE:  GM canola spreading: Agriculture Canada report
SOURCE: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
        http://cbc.ca/stories/2002/06/27/gncanola020627
DATE:   June 28, 2002

------------------ archive: http://www.gene.ch/genet.html ------------------


GM canola spreading: Agriculture Canada report

see film clip:
http://cbc.ca/clips/ram-lo/crowe_canola020627.ram

WINNIPEG - There is confirmation of something canola farmers have been 
saying for years: that genetically modified canola is popping up where it 
wasn't planted and where it isn't wanted.

INDEPTH: Food Fight
http://cbc.ca/news/indepth/foodfight/index.html

An Agriculture Canada study suggests the problem is in the seeds. More than 
half of the seed samples tested showed some level of genetically modified 
presence. The study's authors conclude that means almost every canola field 
planted with conventional seed will contain some genetically modified 
plants.

Rene Van Acker, a plant scientist at the University of Manitoba, is 
duplicating the Agriculture Canada study on test fields, checking to see 
how much genetically modified canola has found its way into conventional 
seed through pollen or accidental seed mixing. "I think its very 
significant and I also think its a formal recognition that genetic 
pollution does happen," said Van Acker.

Van Acker is duplicating the study on test fields, checking to see how much 
genetically modified canola has found its way into conventional seed 
through pollen or accidental seed mixing. For farmers it means adding a 
second kind of herbicide to their regular spraying to kill the plants that 
have been genetically modified to resist their regular herbicide.

For organic growers like Mark Loiselle it's a serious problem. "Any 
contamination of seed stock with genetically engineered crops is too much 
for organic production," he said. Loiselle is trying to launch a class 
action suit against the companies that make genetically modified canola. 
It's because of his legal challenge the Agriculture Canada study was 
released.

Earlier this year the CBC program Country Canada used the access to 
information law to get a copy of the study, but with large parts blacked 
out. It was only after Loiselle's lawyer applied to have the whole study 
that Agriculture Canada made it available. "There's a lot at stake here for 
Canada and so we shouldn't have this stuff being hidden. There should be an 
open discussion," said Van Acker.

RELATED STORY: Quebec biologists call for stricter rules on GMOs
http://www.cbc.ca/stories/2002/06/27/biologists_gmos020627

The Canadian Seed Growers Association helped to pay for the study. It says 
it wasn't released because it isn't finished. They also say it just 
confirms what they already knew. "What the report clearly indicates is that 
there isn't 100 per cent purity and we knew that before, so that is not 
rocket science to know that because that is the way mother nature is," said 
Dale Adolphe of the CSGA.



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